Happy Birthday Eva Marie Saint

Tomorrow is the 90th birthday of Eva Marie Saint.  If ever asked to pick my favorite “Hitchcock Blonde,” I would have a very hard time picking just one. Eva Marie Saint is one of them for sure, maybe the first. Her cool sexiness in North by Northwest is par none. My sister and I must have watched that film at least 25 times after school, it was the beginning of my obsession with Mid Century everything and that amazing Paramount VistaVision! You should also watch On The Waterfront to truly see her range, it is her first film and beyond legendary.

Born July 4, 1924  Newark, New Jersey, United States
Occupation: Actress

Eva Marie Saint (born July 4, 1924) is an American actress who has starred in films, on Broadway, and on television in a career spanning seven decades. She won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the drama film On the Waterfront (1954), and later starred in the thriller film North by Northwest (1959), directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Saint received Golden Globe and BAFTA award nominations for the drama film A Hatful of Rain (1957) and won an Emmy Award for the television miniseries People Like Us (1990). Her film career also includes roles in Raintree County (1957), Because of Winn-Dixie (2005), and Superman Returns (2006).

Saint’s first feature-film role, at age 30, was in On the Waterfront (1954), directed by Elia Kazan and starring Marlon Brando – a performance for which she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Her role as Edie Doyle (whose brother’s death sets the film’s drama in motion), which she won over such leading contenders as Claire Trevor, Nina Foch, Katy Jurado, and Jan Sterling also earned her a British Academy of Film and Television Award nomination for “Most Promising Newcomer.” In his New York Times review, film critic Bosley Crowther wrote:

“In casting Eva Marie Saint – a newcomer to movies from TV and Broadway – Mr. Kazan has come up with a pretty and blond artisan who does not have to depend on these attributes. Her parochial school training is no bar to love with the proper stranger. Amid scenes of carnage, she gives tenderness and sensitivity to genuine romance.”

 

In a 2000 interview in Premiere magazine, Saint recalled making the hugely influential film:

“[Elia] Kazan put me in a room with Marlon Brando. He said ‘Brando is the boyfriend of your sister. You’re not used to being with a young man. Don’t let him in the door under any circumstances’. I don’t know what he told Marlon; you’ll have to ask him – good luck! [Brando] came in and started teasing me. He put me off-balance. And I remained off-balance for the whole shoot.”

The film was a major success and launched Saint’s movie career. She starred with Don Murray in the pioneering drug-addiction drama, A Hatful of Rain (1957), for which she received a nomination for the “Best Foreign Actress” award from the British Academy of Film and Television, and the lavish Civil War epic Raintree County (also 1957) with Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift.

Director Alfred Hitchcock surprised many by choosing Saint over dozens of other candidates for the femme fatale role in what was to become a suspense classic North by Northwest (1959) with Cary Grant and James Mason. Written by Ernest Lehman, the film updated and expanded upon the director’s early “wrong man” spy adventures of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, including The 39 Steps, Young and Innocent, and Foreign Correspondent. North by Northwest became a box-office hit and an influence on spy films for decades. The film ranks number forty on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time.

At the time of the film’s production, much publicity was gained by Hitchcock’s decision to cut Saint’s waist-length blonde hair for the first time in her career. Hitchcock explained at the time, “Short hair gives Eva a more exotic look, in keeping with her role of the glamorous woman of my story. I wanted her dressed like a kept woman – smart, simple, subtle and quiet. In other words, anything but the bangles and beads type.” The director also worked with Saint to make her voice lower and huskier and even personally chose costumes for her during a shopping trip to Bergdorf Goodman in New York City.

The change in Saint’s screen persona, coupled with her adroit performance as a seductive woman of mystery who keeps Cary Grant (and the audience) off-balance, was widely heralded. In his New York Times review of August 7, 1959, critic Bosley Crowther wrote, “In casting Eva Marie Saint as [Cary Grant's] romantic vis-a-vis, Mr. Hitchcock has plumbed some talents not shown by the actress heretofore. Although she is seemingly a hard, designing type, she also emerges both the sweet heroine and a glamorous charmer.” In 2000, recalling her experience making the picture with Cary Grant and Hitchcock, Saint said, “[Grant] would say, ‘See, Eva Marie, you don’t have to cry in a movie to have a good time. Just kick up your heels and have fun.’ Hitchcock said, ‘I don’t want you to do a sink-to-sink movie again, ever. You’ve done these black-and-white movies like On the Waterfront. It’s drab in that tenement house. Women go to the movies, and they’ve just left the sink at home. They don’t want to see you at the sink.’ I said, ‘I can’t promise you that, Hitch, because I love those dramas.’”

She has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, for motion pictures at 6624 Hollywood Boulevard, and television at 6730 Hollywood Boulevard.

The Birds – Required Viewing

birds

The Wiki:

The Birds is a 1963 suspense/horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the 1952 story “The Birds” by Daphne du Maurier. It depicts Bodega Bay, California, which is, suddenly and for unexplained reasons, the subject of a series of widespread and violent bird attacks over the course of a few days.

The film was billed as ‘introducing’ Tippi Hedren. It also starred Rod Taylor, Jessica Tandy, Suzanne Pleshette and a young Veronica Cartwright.

The screenplay was written by Evan Hunter. Hitchcock told him to develop new characters and a more elaborate plot, keeping Du Maurier’s title and concept of unexplained bird attacks.

Happy Birthday Jimmy Stewart

Yesterday was the 106th birthday of Jimmy Stewart.  Chances are that one of your favorite classic movies also happens to be one of his.  Some of my favorites of his are:  After The Thin Man, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington, The Philadelphia Story, Rear Window and  The Man Who Knew Too Much.  I could have gone on naming more, I could have just copied his IMDB listings and it would have been accurate.

NAME:  Jimmy Stewart
OCCUPATION:  Film Actor, Theater Actor
BIRTH DATE:  May 20, 1908
DEATH DATE:  July 2, 1997
EDUCATION:  Princeton University
PLACE OF BIRTH:  Indiana, Pennsylvania
PLACE OF DEATH:  Beverly Hills, California

Best Known For: Jimmy Stewart was a major motion-picture star known for his portrayals of diffident but morally resolute characters in films such as It’s a Wonderful Life.

One of film’s most beloved actors, Jimmy Stewart made more than 80 films in his lifetime. He was known for his everyman quality, which made him both appealing and accessible to audiences. Stewart grew up in the small town of Indiana, Pennsylvania, where his father operated a hardware store.

Stewart got his first taste of performing during his time as a young man. At Princeton University, he acted in shows as a member of the Triangle Club, which put on shows. Stewart earned a degree in architecture in 1932, but he never practiced the trade. Instead he joined the University Players in Falmouth, Massachusetts, the summer after he graduated. There Stewart met fellow actor Henry Fonda, who became a lifelong friend.

That same year, Stewart made his Broadway debut in Carrie Nation. The show didn’t fare well, but he soon found more stage roles. In 1935, Stewart landed a movie contract with MGM and headed out west.

In his early Hollywood days, Stewart shared an apartment with Henry Fonda. The tall, lanky actor worked a number of films before co-starring with Eleanor Powell in the 1936 popular musical comedy Born to Dance. The movie featured the Cole Porter hit “Easy to Love.” Another career breakthrough came with Frank Capra’s You Can’t Take It With You (1938). This comedy won an Academy Award for Best Picture, and made Stewart a star.

Stewart also played the lead in Capra’s Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939). In this film, he portrayed a young, idealistic politician who takes on corruption. Stewart received his first Academy Award nomination for this film. The following year, he took home Oscar gold for The Philadelphia Story. Stewart co-starred with Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant, two other major movie stars, in the romantic comedy.

From 1941 to 1946, Stewart took a break from his acting career to serve in World War II. He joined the U.S. Air Force and rose up through the ranks to become a colonel by war’s end. In 1946, Stewart returned to the big screen with It’s a Wonderful Life directed by Frank Capra. This film tells the story about a man brought back from the verge of suicide by a guardian angel and visions of the world without him. It was a disappointment at the box office, but it became a holiday favorite over the years. Stewart reportedly considered it to be one of his favorite films.

Stewart soon starred in Harvey (1950), a humorous movie about a man with an imaginary rabbit for a friend. But he seemed to be less interested in doing this type of lighthearted film in his later career. Stewart sought out grittier fare after the war, appearing in Anthony Mann’s westerns Winchester ’73 (1950) and Broken Arrow (1950). He also became a favorite of director Alfred Hitchcock, who cast in several thrillers. They first worked together on Rope (1948). Vertigo (1958) is considered by many to be Hitchcock’s masterpiece and one of Stewart’s best performances. The following year, Stewart also won rave reviews for his work in Otto Preminger’s Anatomy of a Murder.

In the 1970s, Stewart made two attempts at series television. He starred on The Jimmy Stewart Show, a sitcom, which ran from 1971 to 1972. The following year, he switched to drama with Hawkins. Stewart played a small-town lawyer on the show, which proved to be short-lived. Around this time, he also made a few film appearances. Stewart worked opposite John Wayne, Lauren Bacall and Ron Howard in the 1976 western The Shootist.

Stewart became the recipient of numerous tributes during the 1980s for his substantial career. In 1984, Steward picked up an honorary Academy Award “for his high ideals both on and off the screen.” By the 1990s, Stewart had largely stepped out of the public eye. He was deeply affected by the death of his wife Gloria in 1994. The couple had been married since 1949 and had twin daughters together. He also became a father to her two sons from a previous marriage. Jimmy and Gloria Stewart were one of Hollywood’s most enduring couples, and his apparent love and commitment to her added to his reputation as an upstanding and honorable person.

Poor health plagued Stewart in his final years. He died on July 2, 1997, in Beverly Hills, California. While he may be gone, his movies have lived on and inspired countless other performers. Stewart’s warmth, good humor and easy charm have left a lasting impression on American pop culture.

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Strangers on a Train – Required Viewing

A tennis pro Guy Haines happens to meet a wealthy wastrel Bruno Anthony on a train. Having read all about Guy, Bruno is aware that he is trapped in an unhappy marriage to to wife Miriam and has been seen in the company of senator’s daughter Ann Morton. Baiting Guy, Bruno reveals that he feels trapped by his hated father. As Guy listens with detached amusement, Bruno discusses the theory of exchange murders. Suppose that Bruno were to murder Guy’s wife, and Guy in exchange were to kill Bruno’s father? With no known link between the two men, the police would be none the wiser, would they? When he reaches his destination, Guy bids goodbye to Bruno, thinking nothing more of the affable but rather curious young man’s homicidal theories. And then, Guy’s wife turns up strangled to death…
strangers

The Wiki:

Strangers on a Train is an American psychological thriller film produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and based on the 1950 novel of the same name by Patricia Highsmith. It was shot in the autumn of 1950 and released by Warner Bros. on June 30, 1951. The film stars Farley Granger, Ruth Roman, and Robert Walker, and features Leo G. Carroll, Patricia Hitchcock, and Laura Elliott.

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Happy Birthday Anthony Perkins

Today is the 82nd birthday of Anthony Perkins.

NAME: Anthony Perkins
OCCUPATION: Actor
BIRTH DATE: April 04, 1932
DEATH DATE: September 12, 1992
EDUCATION: The Brooks School, The Browne & Nichols School, Columbia University, Rollins College
PLACE OF BIRTH: New York City, New York
PLACE OF DEATH: Hollywood, California
FULL NAME: Anthony Perkins

BEST KNOWN FOR: Anthony Perkins is an Oscar-nominated stage and film actor who is best known for his role as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho.

Anthony Perkins was born in New York City, New York on April 4, 1932, to Janet Rane and Osgood Perkins, an actor. The younger Perkins would eventually speak of having a tortured, emotionally strained relationship with his parents and feeling deep anguish over the death of his father when he was 5 years old.

At age 15, Perkins joined Actors Equity and began performing in stage productions, eventually attending Rollins College and Columbia University. He made his feature film debut in The Actress (1953), co-starring with Jean Simmons and Spencer Tracy, and went on to do television and stage work, earning praise for his Broadway debut in 1954′s Tea and Sympathy. Perkins began to establish himself as a singer, as well.

The lanky thespian returned to the big screen in the 1956 drama Friendly Persuasion portraying a young Quaker caught between his spiritual, pacifist upbringing and military obligation during the Civil War. Perkins earned a supporting actor Oscar nomination for the role, continuing to build performances noted for their sensitivity and genuineness.

In addition to starring in the westerns The Tin Star and The Lonely Man in 1957, Perkins garnered acclaim as a leading man in the film Fear Strikes Out. Here Perkins played Jimmy Piersall, a famed baseball player who suffers a devastating emotional breakdown.

At the close of the decade, Perkins took on more romantic fare in films like The Matchmaker (1958; with Shirley MacLaine) and Green Mansions (1959; with Audrey Hepburn), and earned a Tony Award nomination. Then, in 1960, he starred in what would become one of the most talked about horror films in cinematic history—Psycho, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Co-starring with Janet Leigh and Vera Miles in the film, Perkins played Norman Bates, a seemingly helpful innkeeper with a sinister, sociopathic secret.

Typecasting from the Bates role would follow Perkins for years in American film circles, and he would relocate to Europe after receiving recognition at Cannes for his part in the Ingrid Bergman film Goodbye Again (1961). Perkins starred in several Europe-based films throughout the 1960s, including Orson Welles’s The Trial (1963), but would eventually return to American films.

His 1970s work included the mystery ensemble Murder on the Orient Express (1974), the drama Mahogany (1975; with Diana Ross) and the Disney sci-fi adventure The Black Hole (1979). He also co-wrote the 1973 film The Last of Sheila with Stephen Sondheim.

That same year, Perkins married Berry Berenson, with whom he would co-star in the films Remember My Name (1978) and Winter Kills (1979).

Then, from 1983 to 1990, Perkins reprised his Bates role and starred in three Psycho follow-ups, one of which he directed—1986′s Psycho III.

During the late 1980s, Perkins was diagnosed with HIV. Though he kept the news secret, he worked with Berenson for Project Angel Food, an organization that provides meals for individuals who are homebound due to HIV. On September 12, 1992, Perkins died from AIDS-related pneumonia at his home in Hollywood, California. He was survived by his wife and sons Osgood and Elvis. Osgood later chose to follow in his father’s footsteps, pursuing acting.

Perkins was portrayed by British actor James D’Arcy in the 2012 film Hitchcock. Perkins’s Psycho role continues to live on, as well—in the 2013 cable series Bates Motel, which looks at the fictional innkeeper’s life before the events of the famous film.

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Rear Window – Required Viewing

My sister and I watched Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window dozens of times after school and even now, I can recite along with a good portion of the movie.  Rear Window is where I first fell in love with Thelma Ritter.  Don’t get me wrong, Jimmy Stewart is amazing and Grace Kelly is absolute perfection, but Thelma Ritter is something extra.  Her character has a majority of the quotable dialogue and she delivers it with a natural ease that I had never seen before.  I have sought out her other films because of Rear Window and have been lucky to experience them.

I think that this film may also be the spark that lit my fascination with the mid-century mid-Atlantic accent (or was it Desk Set?) that for the longest time I thought was only spoken on Hollywood sound stages until I heard Little Edie Beale explain her perfect costume for the day.

If you have not seen the bonus material on the DVD for Rear Window, it is an absolute must, it will make you appreciate the film even more.

Rear Window - James Stewart and Grace Kelly

The Wiki:

Rear Window is a 1954 American suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, written by John Michael Hayes and based on Cornell Woolrich‘s 1942 short story “It Had to Be Murder“. Originally released by Paramount Pictures, the film stars James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Thelma Ritter and Raymond Burr. It was screened at the 1954 Venice Film Festival.

The film is considered by many filmgoers, critics and scholars to be one of Hitchcock’s best. The film received four Academy Award nominations and was ranked #42 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Movies list and #48 on the 10th-anniversary edition. In 1997, Rear Window was added to the United States National Film Registry.

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North by Northwest – Required Viewing

I have seen this film countless times, it was one of the ones in heavy rotation after school.  We watched it from a VHS we recorded off of a television broadcast.  Even now when I watch it, I see new aspects of the Hitchcock genius.  It has everything.

north-by-northwest

The Wiki:

North by Northwest is a 1959 American thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason. The screenplay was written by Ernest Lehman, who wanted to write “the Hitchcock picture to end all Hitchcock pictures”.

North by Northwest is a tale of mistaken identity, with an innocent man pursued across the United States by agents of a mysterious organization who want to stop his interference in their plans to smuggle out microfilm containing government secrets.

This is one of several Hitchcock films with a music score by Bernard Herrmann and features a memorable opening title sequence by graphic designer Saul Bass. This film is generally cited as the first to feature extended use of kinetic typography in its opening credits.

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Rear View Mirror – My Week in Review

Here is a list of the internet things I found interesting this week and the weekly roundup of what I did on the internets this week:

1.  Video producer and father of four, Nathan Ripperger, has caught himself saying the darndest things to his kids. It’ just another day in the life of a parent, only Nathan decided to illustrate his most ‘introspective’ quips.

The series has become so popular that it has spawned a series of prints (8 x 10 and 16 x 20) that you can purchase from Ripperger’s Etsy Store. You can also view larger versions of each illustration on Nathan’s Flickr profile.

2.  If you literally put your phone down on a flat surface for 10 minutes, corporate sponsors like Giorgio Armani Fragrances will donate money to the UNICEF Tap Project that will then be used towards water, sanitation and hygiene programs in the neediest countries. According to the organization, ”768 million people do not have access to safe, clean drinking water, and 2.5 billion people live without proper sanitation.”  (I did it twice this morning)

3.  This is amazing.  It’s a feature-length mashup of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 original and Gus Van Sant‘s shot-for-shot 1998 remake, available to watch in full on Steven Soderbergh’s website.

4.  Clap along:

5.  How To Stop Giving A Fuck What People Think.  Living a life that follows the ideal notions of what other people think is a terrible way to live. It makes you become the spineless spectator who waits for other people to take action first. It makes you become a follower. Worst of all, it makes you become someone who doesn’t take a stand for anything.  READ THIS NOW and going forward, give ZERO FUCKS about what others think.

This week on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of Diana Vreeland, Elizabeth Taylor, Tony Randall, Betty Hutton, Dorothy Stratten, Zeppo Marx , Desi Arnaz, Dr. Seuss and Jim Backus. I also added Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House to the the required viewing film series.

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Most Popular Post This Week: Happy Birthday Elizabeth Taylor

This week on Wasp & Pear on tumblr, I posted vintage photographs of Seattle, Hollywood, and New York, as well as continued with the Randomly Generated Wallpaper series. I celebrated the birthday of John Steinbeck and Larry Gelbart.

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Most Popular Post: Andy Warhol Dies

On @TheRealSPA on twitter, I questioned if I could finally now go back to ignoring Arizona again, I called Arizona “Uganda Lite”, I reported the breaking of my mobile phone (again), and the usual trash talk.

Total Tweets: 945
Following: 294
Followers: 88

Here’s where I’m @:

I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA
I ADN at alpha.app.net/spa

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Happy Birthday Tallulah Bankhead

Tomorrow is the 112th birthday of Tallulah Bankhead.  She was a hard-drinking, chain-smoking, foul-mouthed broad who’s brilliance may very well have been in being Tallulah Bankhead.  She is what the world needed:  a smart, quick-witted shit-kicker that made us laugh uncomfortably at her brave observations and truths. 

 

NAME: Tallulah Brockman Bankhead
OCCUPATION: Film Actress, Theater Actress
BIRTH DATE: January 31, 1902
DEATH DATE: December 12, 1968
PLACE OF BIRTH: Hunstville, Alabama
PLACE OF DEATH: New York City, New York

BEST KNOWN FOR: Tullulah Bankhead was an American stage and film actress, popular from the 1920s through the 1950s.

Born to a prestigious family (her father became a prominent congressman), she made her Broadway debut in 1918 and achieved fame on the London stage in The Dancer (1923). Her vivid presence and throaty voice contributed to her singular performances in the hit plays The Little Foxes (1939), The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), and Private Lives (1946). She made films such as A Woman’s Law (1928) and Alfred Hitchcock’s Lifeboat (1944) but remained primarily a stage performer. Her final stage appearance was in The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore (1964).

Personal Quotes:

“Say anything about me, darling, as long as it isn’t boring.”

“It’s the good girls that keep diaries. Bad girls never have the time.”

Tallulah Bankhead died in St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City of double pneumonia, complicated by emphysema and malnutrition, at 7:45 A.M. on December 12, 1968, aged 66. She was buried in Saint Paul’s Churchyard, Chestertown, Maryland. Her last coherent words reportedly were “Codeine… bourbon.”

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Tallulah Bankhead has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6141 Hollywood Blvd.

Rock star Suzi Quatro portrayed Bankhead in a musical named Tallulah Who? in 1991. The musical was based on a book by Willie Rushton. Quatro co-wrote the music with Shirlie Roden. The show ran from 14 February to 9 March at The Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch, UK and received favourable reviews.

Valerie Harper starred as Bankhead in Looped, which originated at The Pasadena Playhouse. It opened on Broadway on March 14, 2010 at the Lyceum Theatre, and closed on April 11, 2010.

Other actresses to portray Bankhead include Eugenia Rawls (in her one-woman stage show “Tallulah, A Memory”), Kathleen Turner (in Sandra Ryan Heyward’s one-woman touring show “Tallulah” in the late 1990s), Carrie Nye (on television in The Scarlett O’Hara War) and Helen Gallagher in an off-Broadway musical, Tallulah!

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Happy Birthday Tippi Hedren

Last week was the 84th birthday of Tippi Hendren.  I have said it before, that choosing your favorite Hitchcock blonde is impossible and it’s true.  They all have their qualities that make them special.NAME: Tippi Hedren
OCCUPATION: Animal Rights Activist, Film Actress, Television Actress
BIRTH DATE: January 19, 1930
PLACE OF BIRTH: New Ulm, Michigan
ORIGINALLY: Nathalie Hedren

BEST KNOWN FOR: Actress Tippi Hedren was discovered by Alfred Hitchcock, who cast her in her two most notable films The Birds (1963) and Marnie (1964).

Nathalie Kay “Tippi” Hedren (born January 19, 1930) is an American actress and former fashion model. She is primarily known for her roles in two Alfred Hitchcock films, The Birds and Marnie (in which she played the title role), and her extensive efforts in animal rescue at Shambala Preserve, an 80-acre (320,000 m2) wildlife habitat which she founded in 1983.

Hedren is the mother of actress Melanie Griffith, and they share credits on several productions, notably Pacific Heights (1990).

A Louis Vuitton ad campaign in 2006 paid tribute to Hedren and Hitchcock with a modern-day interpretation of the deserted railway station opening sequence of Marnie. Her 1963 publicity picture from The Birds was the cover for Jean-Pierre Dufreigne’s book Hitchcock Style (2004). In interviews, Naomi Watts has stated that her character interpretation in Mulholland Drive (2001) was influenced by the look and performances of Hedren and Kim Novak in Hitchcock films. Watts and Hedren later acted in I Heart Huckabees (2004) but didn’t share any scenes together onscreen. Off-screen, the film’s director David O. Russell introduced them both, and Watts has said about Hedren, “I was pretty fascinated by her then because people have often said that we’re alike.” Watts was once expected to star in a remake of The Birds (1963) and has dressed up as Hedren’s title character from Marnie for a photo shoot for March 2008 issue of Vanity Fair magazine. In the same issue, Jodie Foster dressed up as Hedren’s character, Melanie Daniels from The Birds (1963).

In another issue of Vanity Fair, the magazine referred to January Jones‘s character in Mad Men as “Tippi Hedren’s soul sister from Marnie”. The New York Times television critic earlier had echoed the same sentiment in his review of Mad Men. January Jones said that she “takes it a compliment of sorts” when compared to Grace Kelly and Hedren. Actress Tea Leoni said that her character in the film Manure (2009) is made up to look like Hedren.

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