Rear View Mirror – Week In Review

Rear View Mirror – Week In Review

It is no secret that I am obsessed with polaroids.  I have four Polaroid Land Camera SX-70s in a drawer in my bedside table, but no film.  I hear there is a place in town, but still…

I have collected all my photos with ‘polaroid’ in the file name into one giant collection, here is what I have:

I may make the Warhol mosaic my new header for various social media things…

The Wiki:

Land cameras are instant cameras with self-developing film named after their inventor,Edwin Land, manufactured by Polaroid between the years of 1947 and 1983. Though Polaroid continued producing instant cameras after 1983, the name ‘Land’ was dropped from the camera name since Edwin Land retired in 1982. The first commercially available model was the Polaroid Land Camera Model 95, which produced prints in about 1 minute, and was first sold to the public in November, 1948.

The SX-70 is a folding single lens reflex Land camera which was produced by thePolaroid Corporation from 1972-1981.

The SX-70 included many sophisticated design elements. A collapsible SLR required a complex light path for the viewfinder, with three mirrors (including one Fresnel reflector) of unusual, aspheric shapes set at odd angles to create an erect image on the film and an erect aerial image for the viewfinder.[3] Many mechanical parts were precision plastic moldings. The body was glass-filled polysulfone, a very rigid plastic which could be plated with genuine copper-nickel-chromium. Models 2 & 3 used the less expensive and more-easily cracked ABS in either Ebony or Ivory color. The film pack contained a flat, 6-volt “PolaPulse” battery to power the camera electronics, drive motor and flash. The original flash system, a disposable “Flash Bar” of 10 bulbs from General Electric, used logic circuits to detect and fire the next unused flash.

This week, on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of Chuck Close, Eva Marie Saint, Twyla Tharp, Peg Entwistle, Olivia de Havilland and America of course. It was a good weekend for birthdays. I have attempted to organize the birthdays in my calendar to maximize the actual date. For instance, tomorrow will is a popular day and I am also booked all week with other birthdays, so there will be four posts tomorrow.

The Stats:

Views This Week: 336
Total views: 116,865
Total Subscribers: 317
Most Popular Post This Week: Happy Birthday Olivia de Havilland

Over on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted photos of very graphic vintage Soviet posters, your standard creepy vintage photos, my absolutely embarrassing reaction to bright light in a Photo Booth (I have no narcissism left), a photo of the simply beautiful Myrna Loy, some clips of early 1970’s TV commercials, some Schoolhouse Rock videos, a couple posters of the great work those guys over at Holstee are creating, very strange bootleg movie posters, vintage photos of Seattle, Hollywood and New York City, celebrated the birthdays of the Sony Walkman and the Zip Code and this video of a drag queen putting a pride parade protester in his palce:

#DaytimeDrag #ServingItUp

The Stats:

Posts This Week: 48
Total Posts: 2,528
Total Subscribers: 180
Most Popular Post: Diane Ladd – Style Icon

Meanwhile, I was tweeting via @TheRealSPA such inspirational and thought-provoking things like:

There are far too many choices when it comes to yogurt.

I stand behind that tweet. I see the people standing in that aisle, lost in analysis-paralysis because they have created something called Creme Brulee Mochaccino Greek yogurt. If this was the Soviet Union it would be “Greek what? Mocha who? You get stale bread.”  The simpler times…

The Stats:

Total Tweets: 270 (scrubbed every 31 days to preserve freshness)
Total Following: 255
Total Followers: 183

I have started putting things on Google+ and LinkedIn to see what would happen, sort of like an experiment. The results are in: nothing. Nothing happened.

come find me, i’m @:

I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA
I Google+ at plus.google.com/+SPAghettiBatman
I don’t fine jobs on linkedin.com/in/scottparkeranderson

Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

This week, I opted out of Facebook’s (and a lot of other site’s) target advertising.  You can visit this website built by the Digital Advertising Alliance to tell Facebook and other companies that you don’t want to receive specially targeted ads.

I read a bit about Father’s Day this morning. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to make it an official holiday, but congress resisted, fearing it would become too commercialized. It wasn’t until 1972 that it was made a permanent national holiday when President Richard Nixon signed it into law.

Congress was right to be concerned. If my inbox is any indication as to the commercialization of the holiday, I have plenty of coupon codes for everywhere you can think of. Although, it appears that everywhere thinks that Dads are most interested in beer, bacon, fishing and zombies. So, Dads are basically a handlebar mustache away from being hipsters? Here are some photos of gifts being advertised that would make any father wish for a time machine and a vasectomy.

This week on Waldina, I added Boom! Bringing up Baby and Pretty in Pink to the required viewing series and celebrated the birthdays of Paul Lynde, Cole Porter and Huguette Clark.

The Stats:

Views This Week: 450
All Time views: 115,597
Total Posts: 1,151
Total Subscribers: 310

This week on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted vintage photographs of Seattle, New York and Hollywood; the art of Roy Lichtenstein, Paul Klee, Butcher Billy, Andy Warhol, and a few pictures of abandoned places.

The Stats:

Posts This Week: 66
All Time Posts: 2,418
Total Subscribers: 177

This week over at @TheRealSPA on Twitter, I tweeted “Shall we place bets on how long it will take the tailor to tell me I look tired?” The results were in within 30 minutes of arrival.

The Stats:

Total Tweets: 303 (old ones purged automatically to preserve topical freshness)
Followers: 171
Following: 230

come find me, i’m @:

I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA

Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

Last night, I had a dream where my teeth were falling out repeatedly. I know that this is a common theme, but I could not remember what this dream was supposed to symbolize. As everyone probably knows, I believe in basically nothing, I believe in fortune cookies more than I do in Karma, dreams, or any white-bearded sky god. I think that people cling to explanations because the alternative is that bad things happen to good people, nothing makes sense, and organic randomness really does suck sometimes. Shit happens for no reason. I could go on and on, just follow fake god and fake jesus on twitter and they do it better. Back to teeth. So, if I appear toothless in a dream, it is supposed to signify my inability to reach my goals and advance toward my interests. Dreams of teeth falling out are rooted in fear of impotence. I can see how they can draw on that, loss of bite, loss of power. But, if I think about it, my teeth are a bit sore from yesterday’s white strips, so there’s that.

Another dream I had last night was that I was asked to go to my old job so the manager could give me a review she forgot to complete. In the dream, it did not go well. For her. Giving someone a job review that has nothing to lose never goes well for the reviewer. I think that is why they have done away with exit interviews at most places and just hand out blank pieces of paper with instructions to list the people that suck. If anything, this dream is just more about consolidating memories and making space. It’s not resolution and/or closure. Those things don’t actually exist.

 

 

This week on Waldina, I celebrated a lot of birthdays: Marilyn Monroe, Christine Jorgensen, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Bob Hope, Dashiell Hammett, Isadora Duncan, Vincent Price, Dorothea Lange and Pam Grier.

The Stats:

Views This Week:  460
All Time Views:  114,558
Total Posts:  1,137
Total Subscribers:  307
Most Popular Post This WeekHappy Birthday Marilyn Monroe

This week on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted artwork by Patrick Nagel, Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, and Aleksandr Rodchenko; photographs of abandoned buildings; photographs of classic Hollywood, vintage Seattle, and New York City; profiles of trans people; some great quotes about climate change and fire arm control; pictures of abandoned places; profiles of people that made the world a better place; and the obituary of Bunny Yeager.

The Stats:

Posts This Week:  77
Total Posts:  2,352
New Subscribers This Week:  4
Total Subscribers:  176
Most Popular Post This Week:   The Car Park Theatre of Detroit

This week over at @TheRealSPA on Twitter, I changed my banner image to a retrospect of Keith Haring art, I tweeted the entire transcript to the 1968 film “Boom!” (well, a link to it, but I wish I knew how to do that), a photograph of YSL (my personal style icon), a photo of me in my new glasses, and well, it goes on and on like that.  But most notably (to me), I was retweeted by the Keith Haring Foundation.  I think it is really cool, it made my week!

The Stats:

Total Tweets:  332 (automatically deleted after 31 days to preserve freshness)
Total Followers:  153
Total Following:  206

This week @TheRealSPA on Instagram, I posted these:

The Stats:

Total Posts: 588
Followers: 119
Following: 123

come find me, i’m @:

I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA

Enhanced by Zemanta

Grace Jones – Style Icon

Today is the 62nd birthday of the absolutely ageless Grace Jones.  I first experienced her when she and Adam Ant made a Honda Elite Scooter commercial.  I thought they were both the coolest people I had ever seen.

Birth name: Grace Jones
Born: 19 May 1952  Linstead, St. Catherine, Jamaica
Occupations: actress, singer/songwriter, model, artist

Grace Jones (born May 19, 1952) is a Jamaican-American singer, model and actress.
Jones started out as a model and became a muse to Andy Warhol, who photographed her extensively. During that era she regularly went to the New York City nightclub Studio 54. Grace secured a record deal with Island Records in 1977, which resulted in a string of dance-club hits. In the late 1970s, she adapted the emerging electronic music style and adopted a severe, androgynous look with square-cut hair and angular, padded clothes. Many of her the singles were hits on Billboard’s Hot Dance Club Play and Hot Dance Airplay charts, for example 1981 “Pull Up to the Bumper“, which spent seven weeks at #2 on the U.S. dance chart. Jones was able to find mainstream success in Europe, particularly the United Kingdom, scoring a number of Top 40 entries on the UK Singles Chart. Her most notable albums are Warm Leatherette, Nightclubbing and Slave to the Rhythm, while her biggest hits (other than “Pull Up to the Bumper”) are “I’ve Seen That Face Before (Libertango)”, “Private Life”, “Slave to the Rhythm” and “I’m Not Perfect (But I’m Perfect for You)”.

Jones is also an actress. Her acting occasionally overshadowed her musical output in America; but not in Europe, where her profile as a recording artist was much higher. She appeared in some low-budget films in the 1970s and early 1980s. Her work as an actress in mainstream film began in the 1984 fantasy-action film Conan the Destroyer alongside Arnold Schwarzenegger, and the 1985 James Bond movie A View to a Kill. In 1986 she played a vampire in Vamp, and both acted in and contributed a song to the 1992 film Boomerang with Eddie Murphy. In 2001, she appeared in Wolf Girl alongside Tim Curry.

grace-jones

Enhanced by Zemanta

Happy Birthday Richard Avedon

Today is the 91st birthday of famed photographer Richard Avedon.  His iconic images capture the beauty, fragility, vulnerability, and life of his subjects that very few other photographers have the ability to express.

 

NAME: Richard Avedon
OCCUPATION: Photographer
BIRTH DATE: May 15, 1923
DEATH DATE: October 01, 2004
EDUCATION: DeWitt Clinton High School
PLACE OF BIRTH: New York, New York
PLACE OF DEATH: San Antonio, Texas

Best Known For:  American photographer Richard Avedon was best known for his work in the fashion world and for his minimalist, large-scale character-revealing portraits.

Richard Avedon was born on May 15, 1923 in New York City. His mother, Anna Avedon, came from a family of dress manufacturers, and his father, Jacob Israel Avedon, owned a clothing store called Avedon’s Fifth Avenue. Inspired by his parents’ clothing businesses, as a boy Avedon took a great interest in fashion, especially enjoying photographing the clothes in his father’s store. At the age of 12, he joined the YMHA (Young Men’s Hebrew Association) Camera Club.

Avedon later described one childhood moment in particular as helping to kindle his interest in fashion photography: “One evening my father and I were walking down Fifth Avenue looking at the store windows,” he remembered. “In front of the Plaza Hotel, I saw a bald man with a camera posing a very beautiful woman against a tree. He lifted his head, adjusted her dress a little bit and took some photographs. Later, I saw the picture in Harper’s Bazaar. I didn’t understand why he’d taken her against that tree until I got to Paris a few years later: the tree in front of the Plaza had that same peeling bark you see all over the Champs-Elysees.”

Avedon attended DeWitt Clinton High School in New York City, where one of his classmates and closest friends was the great writer James Baldwin. In addition to his continued interest in fashion and photography, in high school Avedon also developed an affinity for poetry. He and Baldwin served as co-editors of the school’s prestigious literary magazine, The Magpie, and during his senior year, in 1941, Avedon was named “Poet Laureate of New York City High Schools.” After graduating that summer, Avedon enrolled at Columbia University to study philosophy and poetry. However, he dropped out after only one year to serve in the United States Merchant Marine during World War II. As a Photographer’s Mate Second Class, his main duty was taking identification portraits of sailors. Avedon served in the Merchant Marine for two years, from 1942 to 1944.

Upon leaving the Merchant Marine in 1944, Avedon attended the New School for Social Research in New York City to study photography under Alexey Brodovitch, the acclaimed art director of Harper’s Bazaar. Avedon and Brodovitch formed a close bond, and within one year Avedon was hired as a staff photographer for the magazine. After several years photographing daily life in New York City, Avedon was assigned to cover the spring and fall fashion collections in Paris. While legendary editor Carmel Snow covered the runway shows, Avedon’s task was to stage photographs of models wearing the new fashions out in the city itself. Throughout the late 1940s and early 1950s he created elegant black-and-white photographs showcasing the latest fashions in real-life settings such as Paris’s picturesque cafes, cabarets and streetcars.

Already established as one of the most talented young fashion photographers in the business, in 1955 Avedon made fashion and photography history when he staged a photo shoot at a circus. The iconic photograph of that shoot, “Dovima with Elephants,” features the most famous model of the time in a black Dior evening gown with a long white silk sash. She is posed between two elephants,  her back serenely arched as she holds on to the trunk of one elephant while reaching out fondly toward the other. The image remains one of the most strikingly original and iconic fashion photographs of all time. “He asked me to do extraordinary things,” Dovima said of Avedon. “But I always knew I was going to be part of a great picture.”

Avedon served as a staff photographer for Harper’s Bazaar for 20 years, from 1945 to 1965. In addition to his fashion photography, he was also well known for his portraiture. His black-and-white portraits were remarkable for capturing the essential humanity and vulnerability lurking in such larger-than-life figures as President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Marilyn Monroe, Bob Dylan and The Beatles. During the 1960s, Avedon also expanded into more explicitly political photography. He did portraits of civil rights leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and Julian Bond, as well as segregationists such as Alabama Governor George Wallace, and ordinary people involved in demonstrations. In 1969, he shot a series of Vietnam War portraits that included the Chicago Seven, American soldiers and Vietnamese napalm victims.

Avedon left Harper’s Bazaar in 1965, and from 1966 to 1990 he worked as a photographer for Vogue, its chief rival among American fashion magazines. He continued to push the boundaries of fashion photography with surreal, provocative and often controversial pictures in which nudity, violence and death featured prominently. He also continued to take illuminating portraits of leading cultural and political figures, ranging from Stephen Sondheim and Toni Morrison to Hillary Clinton. In addition to his work for Vogue, Avedon was also a driving force behind photography’s emergence as a legitimate art form during the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s. In 1959 he published a book of photographs, Observations, featuring commentary by Truman Capote, and in 1964 he published Nothing Personal, another collection of photographs, with an essay by his old friend James Baldwin.

In 1974 Avedon’s photographs of his terminally ill father were featured at the Museum of Modern Art, and the next year a selection of his portraits was displayed at the Marlborough Gallery. In 1977, a retrospective collection of his photographs, “Richard Avedon: Photographs 1947-1977,” was exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art before beginning an international tour of many of the world’s most famous museums. As one of the first self-consciously artistic commercial photographers, Avedon played a large role in defining the artistic purpose and possibilities of the genre.

“The moment an emotion or fact is transformed into a photograph it is no longer a fact but an opinion,” he once said. “There is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.”

Richard Avedon married a model named Dorcas Nowell in 1944, and they remained married for six years before parting ways in 1950. In 1951, he married a woman named Evelyn Franklin; they had one son, John, before they also divorced.

In 1992,  Avedon became the first staff photographer in the history of The New Yorker. “I’ve photographed just about everyone in the world,” he said at the time. “But what I hope to do is photograph people of accomplishment, not celebrity, and help define the difference once again.” His last project for The New Yorker, which remained unfinished, was a portfolio entitled “Democracy” that included portraits of political leaders such as Karl Rove and John Kerry as well as ordinary citizens engaged in political and social activism.

Richard Avedon passed away on October 1, 2004, while on assignment for The New Yorker in San Antonio, Texas. He was 81 years old.

One of the greatest photographers of the 20th century, Richard Avedon expanded the genre of photography with his surreal and provocative fashion photography as well as portraits that bared the souls of some of the most important and opaque figures in the world. Avedon was such a predominant cultural force that he inspired the classic 1957 film Funny Face, in which Fred Astaire’s character is based on Avedon’s life. While much has been and continues to be written about Avedon, he always believed that the story of his life was best told through his photographs. Avedon said, “Sometimes I think all my pictures are just pictures of me. My concern is… the human predicament; only what I consider the human predicament may simply be my own.”

Enhanced by Zemanta

Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

Today is the birthdays of Keith Haring and Audrey Hepburn. I find them both exceptionally inspirational and know that I take bits and pieces of their lives as lessons on how to make myself better.

R worked late last night, so I drove to Issaquah and went to the gym, why Issaquah?  The gym I go to normally closes at 7:00pm on Saturdays and the Issaquah one is open until 10:00pm.  That was my Saturday night.  I do have to say that I did love driving around in the rain and listening to Sonic Reducer on KEXP.

Also, apparently when I am bored, I shop for tattoo artist/parlors for these new tattoos that I have in my head.  I figure I am not getting any younger and why not?  The next one is going to be words across my chest in some sort of fancy script.  It seems unexpected and out of character and that is what I am liking the most about it.  Mix it up.

This week on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of the industrious Dick Proeneke, the poetic Harper Lee, and the beautiful Bianca Jagger, I posted the Holstee Manifesto, I added one of Audrey Hepburn’s quotes to the Words To Live By series, I suggested A Place In The Sun to the Required Viewing film list, and I made my annual plea to please wear sunblock. A nice varied list.

The Stats:

Views This Week: 552
Total Views; 112,307
Total Subscribers: 291
Total Posts:1,099
Most Popular Post This Week: Banned Books That Shaped America: The Scarlet Letter

Over on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr I posted inspirational 70’s posters (and there are a lot more to come), a Cazwell video, vintage photos of Hollywood, New York City, and Seattle, and bad Chinese translations. I also posted a large series of vintage photographs of the Seattle Worlds Fair (the colors are incredible). There are of course abandoned places, there always will be. I found a series of photographs that show how much 200 calories of real food is, you would be surprised. I posted photographs of the art of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Keith Haring.  This week, I also started following a friend of 30+ years:  Bee Lavender, as should you.

The Stats:

Posts This Week: 45
Total Posts: 2,184
New Subscribers This Week: 3
Total Subscribers: 169

This week at @TheRealSPA on Twitter, I started following KEXP’s Sonic Reducer show @kexppunkshow, Cazwell @CAZWELLnyc, filippo fiora the editor of The Three F @filippofiora, Lifehack @lifehackorg, and Holstee @HOLSTEE. I tweeted the posts that I made on Instagram, Waldina, and Wasp & Pear.

The Stats:

Total Tweets: 315 (automatically deleted after 31 days to preserve freshness)
Following: 324
Followers: 119

May The 4th Be With You nasty drink recipe:

 

come find me…
I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Happy Birthday Keith Haring – Style Icon

Keith Haring is someone whose work you know. You have seen it everywhere from MTV in the early days to yesterday on the side of a bus. His influence and legacy are far-reaching with no visible end in sight. I remember I bought a Keith Haring shirt one summer in Traverse City Michigan, it must have been 1990. It depicted a snake getting cut in half with the words “End AIDS” running under it. I loved that shirt, it made me feel powerful and involved and it gave me a voice.  Keith would have been 56 years old today if he hadn’t died when he was 32.  Do something today to make him proud.

If nothing else, download the Keith Haring iPad app today from iTunes.  It’s free in honor of his birthday.

 

NAME: Keith Haring
OCCUPATION: Painter
BIRTH DATE: May 04, 1958
DEATH DATE: February 16, 1990
EDUCATION: Ivy School of Professional, Art School of Visual Arts
PLACE OF BIRTH: Reading, Pennsylvania
PLACE OF DEATH: New York, New York

BEST KNOWN FOR: During his all-too-brief life, artist Keith Haring became a sensation in the art world with his bold, cartoon and graffiti influenced works during the 1980s.

The Wiki:

Born on May 4, 1958, in Reading, Pennsylvania. During his all-too-brief life, Keith Haring became a sensation in the art world with his bold, cartoon and graffiti influenced works during the 1980s.

Growing up in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, he spent many hours drawing with his father. Haring was fascinated by the popular cartoon art of Walt Disney and Charles Schultz.

Haring briefly attended the Ivy School of Professional Art in Pittsburgh after graduating high school in 1976. He dropped out after two semesters. In 1978, Haring decided to return to school, moving to New York City to become a student at the School of Visual Arts. With its thriving underground art scene, New York seemed to be the perfect fit for the young artist. He began using the city as his canvas, making chalk drawings of barking dogs and babies in subway stations. He also befriended such other emerging artists as Jean-Michel Basquiat and helped organize exhibitions at nightclubs and other alternative locations.

In 1982, Haring had his first New York one-man show at the Shafrazi Gallery. Not only did he create paintings and sculptures for the show, he engulfed the entire gallery with his bold color choices and frenetic designs. A critical success, he soon became one of most popular artists of the time with exhibits in Japan, Brazil, and many other countries.

Haring collaborated with other artists and performers, including Andy Warhol and William Burroughs.

Wanting to make his art more accessible, Haring opened Pop Shop in New York City in 1986. The store sold posters, t-shirts, and other items baring his artwork and designs. He was also interested many social causes, painting an anti-drug mural that same year. In all, he did more than 50 public works and held numerous workshops for children. In 1988, Haring discovered that he had AIDS. The next year he created the Keith Haring Foundation to support AIDS organizations and children’s programs.

Haring died on February 16, 1990, of AIDS-related complications. His works continues to be exhibited around the world and many are owned by such prestigious museums as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, and the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

Polaroid by Andy Warhol

Enhanced by Zemanta

Happy Birthday Bianca Jagger

Today is the 69th Birthday of Bianca Jagger.  She wore a red off-the-shoulder Halston dress and rode a white horse into Studio 54 at her 30th birthday party.  Why do people even bother to celebrate birthdays after that?  I mean, please.

Born: May 2, 1945
Height: 5′ 4″ (1.63 m)
Full name: Bianca Pérez-Mora Macias
Spouse: Mick Jagger (m. 1971–1977)
Children: Jade Jagger

Bianca Jagger (born Bianca Pérez-Mora Macias, May 2, 1945) is a Nicaraguan-born social and human rights advocate and a former actress and model. Jagger currently serves as a Council of Europe Goodwill Ambassador, Founder and Chair of the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation, Member of the Executive Director‘s Leadership Council of Amnesty International USA, and a Trustee of the Amazon Charitable Trust[citation needed]. Over the past thirty years she has written articles and opinion pieces, delivered keynote speeches at conferences and events throughout the world and participated in numerous television and radio debates, about numerous issues including genocide, the war in Iraq, the war in Afghanistan, the war on terror, war crimes against humanity, crimes against future generations, the Former Yugoslavia, Sri Lanka, Central America, Iran, Iraq, India, children and women’s rights, the rights of indigenous peoples, climate change, the rainforest, renewable energy, corporate social responsibility, the ensuing erosion of civil liberties and human rights, and the death penalty.

“Look at what President Kennedy managed to achieve during the Cuban missile crisis. If Bush had been president in 1962, do you think he would have avoided a nuclear war?” – Bianca Jagger

She was formerly married to Mick Jagger, lead singer of The Rolling Stones.

Bianca+Jagger

In addition to her extensive charitable works, Jagger had a public reputation as a jet-setter and party-goer in the 1970s and early 1980s, being closely associated in the public mind with New York City’s nightclub Studio 54. She also became known particularly as a friend of pop artist Andy Warhol.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

This morning, I woke up thinking about David Rakoff.  I often listen to the audio book version of his last book “Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish: A Novel” because it is read by him, written entirely in verse, and so brilliant my eyes fill with tears when I think of it.  Below the worst picture of him I could find is an essay about Karl Lagerfeld that David Rakoff wrote a while back. History has shown us that you can be a genius and a monster at the same time.  We have examples of the various perversions and mutations of the genius, but I am guessing that genius or not, the monster part is actually more rooted in insecurities.  A genius should be confident in his abilities and talents.  An evil genius may have come by the “genius” title accidentally and his insecurities of being “found out” have caused him to become a notorious asshole.  When you are a monster, no one bothers to get close enough to find out that you are really just an insecure man guarding the secret that he is merely average.  But David Rakoff (as always) says it best.

fat-karl-lagerfeld

“All of the designers I have met up to this point have been very nice, although upon being introduced to Karl Lagerfeld, he looks me up and down and dismisses me with the not super-kind, “What can you write that hasn’t been written already?”

He’s absolutely right, I have no idea. I can but try. The only thing I can come up with right now is that Lagerfeld’s powdered white ponytail has dusted the shoulders of his suit with what looks like dandruff but isn’t. Not having undergone his alarming weight loss yet, seated on a tiny velvet chair, with his large doughy rump dominating the miniature piece of furniture like a loose, flabby, ass-flavored muffin over-risen from its pan, he resembles a Daumier caricature of some corpulent, overfed, inhumane oligarch drawn sitting on a commode, stuffing his greedy throat with the corpses of dead children, while from his other end he shits out huge, malodorous piles of tainted money. How’s that for new and groundbreaking, Mr. L.?”
― David Rakoff, Don’t Get Too Comfortable: The Indignities of Coach Class, The Torments of Low Thread Count, The Never-Ending Quest for Artisanal Olive Oil, and Other First World Problems

This week on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of I. M. Pei, Ella Fitzgerald, Shirley MacLaine, Barbra Streisand, Halston, Edie Sedgwick and Joan Miro.

The Stats:

Views This Week: 787
All Time Views: 111,681
Total Subscribers: 282
Most Popular Post This Week: Rudolph Valentino – Style Icon

This week on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted photos of classic Hollywood, Vintage Seattle. New York City and Interlochen. I posted Style Icon profiles for Lauren Bacall, Keith Haring, Carrie Donovan, Dovima, Francis Farmer, Romon Novarro and Cesar Romero. I celebrated Shakespear’s birthday. I posted the art of Roy Lichtenstein, Keith Haring, Andy Warhol and Cecil Beaton.

The Stats:

Posts This Week: 77
Total Posts: 2,130
New Subscribers: 3
Total Subscribers: 167
Most Popular Post This Week: Happy Birthday Barbra Streisand

This week over at the @TheRealSPA chunck of Twitter, I set up the automatic deletion of tweets older than 31 days and I turned off the retweets of any chronic retweeter. It is just a bit boring.

Come find me…

I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA

Enhanced by Zemanta

Happy Birthday Halston

Today is the 82nd birthday of Halston.  He is one of the first luxury designers to produce a mainstream main street line that let everyone woman in America feel glamorous.  His townhouse at 101 East 63 Street is one of my not so secret obsessions (photos below).

NAME: Roy Halston Frowick
OCCUPATION: Fashion Designer
BIRTH DATE: April 23, 1932
DEATH DATE: March 26, 1990
PLACE OF BIRTH: Des Moines, Iowa
PLACE OF DEATH: San Francisco, California
AKA: Halston

BEST KNOWN FOR: Roy Halston Frowick, best known as Halston, was an iconic clothing designer of the 1970s. His sexy, yet elegant dresses became a staple in American discos.

Halston was born on April 23, 1932 in Des Moines, Iowa. The son of a Norwegian-American accountant and his wife, Halston was originally given the name Roy Halston Frowick. He later dropped his first and last names, preferring the moniker. As a boy, Halston loved to alter and make clothes for his mother and sister. He studied at Indiana University and then at the Art Institute of Chicago. While attending night courses at the Art Institute, he worked as a fashion merchandiser at the upscale chain department store Carson Pirie Scott. Soon after, he met André Basil, a hairdresser who owned a prestigious salon at the Ambassador Hotel. Taken by both the man and his work, Basil set up a display of Halston’s hats in his salon. When Basil opened his Boulevard Salon on North Michigan Avenue, he offered Halston half the space for display. In 1959 their personal relationship ended, and Halston moved to New York to take a design position with the respected milliner Lily Daché.

Halston’s hat designs brought the fantastic to whimsy; he used all manner of jewels, flowers and fringe to decorate hoods, bonnets and coifs. Within a year, he was hired to serve as head milliner for the luxury retailer Bergdorf Goodman. In 1961, Jacqueline Kennedy made his work famous when she wore a pillbox hat of his design to her husband’s presidential inauguration. Halston’s friends and clients soon included some of the most alluring and well-known women in the world, including Rita Hayworth, Liza Minnelli, Marlene Dietrich and Diana Vreeland.

Halston began designing women’s wear in 1966, offering a perfect look for the international jet set of his era. His line was renowned for sexy, yet elegant pieces. In the fall of 1972, he introduced a simple shirtwaist dress made from “Ultra suede,” a fabric that was washable, durable and beautiful. Two years later, he offered the world his most iconic design, the halter dress. It was instant hit in America’s discotheques, giving women a narrow, elongated silhouette. Halston’s trademark sunglasses, worn both day and night, completed the look.

Halston was known as the first designer to fully license himself as a brand onto itself; his influence went beyond style to reshape the business of fashion. Through a licensing agreement with JC Penney, he created designs that were accessible to women at a variety of income levels. He also became influential in uniform design, changing the entire feel of Braniff International Airways’ staff uniforms.

In spite of his achievements, his increasing drug use and failure to meet deadlines undermined his success. In 1984, he was fired from his own company and lost the right to design and sell clothes under his own name in. However, he continued to design costumes for his friends Liza Minnelli and Martha Graham. He was a long-time and central figure in the nightlife scene of New York’s Studio 54 disco. He died of lung cancer and complications of AIDS in San Francisco, California, in 1990.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta