Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

Dude, I swear, I don't know those people.
“Dude, I swear, I never said that and I don’t know those people.” – Jesus

 

Some things I have been thinking about this week:

1. Your Facebook “friends” are not really your friends. Facebook is not a real thing. You may know some of them in real life and are actually friends with them, but just because you agreed to connect with them on the internet does not mean you owe anybody anything.

2. Why aren’t parents vaccinating their kids? Are these the same crazy religious weirdoes that also don’t give their kids medicine because it’s “God’s will”?  Those parents end up going to jail for child abuse when their kids die.

3. How many people have to die before people stop responding to mass shootings with candle light vigils and posters and ribbons? None of those things are going to stop a bullet. How many more people have to die before people get angry and start holding elected officials accountable? Until we start electing people that will have the courage to address safer gun regulations and mental illness, innocent people will be murdered. Those innocent people may be your friends, family or you. How fucking stupid does lighting a candle seem now?

 

 

This week on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of Suzi Quatro, colleen Dewhurst, Rosalind Russell, Carmen Dell’Orefice, Hedda Hopper, and the 125th anniversary of the Great Seattle Fire.

The Stats:

Views This Week:  449
All Time Views:  115,087
Total Subscribers:  309
Most Popular Post This Week:    The Great Seattle Fire

north-by-northwest

This week on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted photographs of creepy vintage images that will haunt your dreams, Lucy and Ethel, vintage mug shots, classic Hollywood, abandoned places, set design still of the classic sitcom Bewitched, Vintage Seattle and iconic stills from North By Northwest.

The Stats:

Posts This Week:  87
All Time Posts:  2,385
Total Subscribers:  176
Most Popular Post:  Meet Paisley Currah

ringo

This week I tweeted from @TheRealSPA “Fucking Enough”.

Total Tweets (last 31 days the rest are auto-purged):  323
Total Following:  221
Total Followers:  167

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I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
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I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
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Happy Birthday Hedda Hopper

Today is the 124th birthday of Hollywood gossip columnist Hedda Hopper.

NAME: Hedda Hopper
OCCUPATION: Theater Actress, Film Actor/Film Actress
BIRTH DATE: June 2, 1890
DEATH DATE: February 1, 1966
PLACE OF BIRTH: Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania
PLACE OF DEATH: Hollywood, California
ORIGINALLY: Elda Furry

BEST KNOWN FOR: Hedda Hopper, a woman with amazing hats, was an American gossip columnists during the first half of the 1900s. She was also an actress and radio personality.

Gossip columist and actress Elda Furry, better known as Hedda Hopper, was born on June 2, 1890, in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. One of nine children, Furry studied singing at the Carter Conservatory of Music in Pittsburgh during high school.

At the age of 18, she ran away after her Quaker parents rejected her plans to pursue a career in musical theater. She worked as a chorus girl and appeared in amateur theater productions before making her Broadway debut in 1909 in a small role in The Motor Girl. In 1913, Furry appeared with the popular comedic actor, and notorious womanizer, DeWolf Hopper in the musical comedy A Matinee Idol. Later that same year, she became Hopper’s much-older fifth wife.

She took the name Hedda Hopper in 1919; the first name was reportedly chosen by a numerologist. After making her big screen debut in the 1916 silent film The Battle of Hearts, Hopper found success in Hollywood as a character actress for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), appearing in over 100 films over the next three decades. In 1922, she and DeWolf Hopper divorced.

By the mid-1930s, Hopper was working as a freelance actress (without a studio contract) and her film career had fallen into a slump. Her famous sense of style and outspoken personality led to jobs at Elizabeth Arden cosmetics and as a fashion commentator on a Hollywood radio station. In 1937, the Esquire Feature Syndicate was looking for a Hollywood columnist and found one in Hopper. Untried, her column was sold to 13 papers and a career was launched.

When the column began appearing in the prestigious Los Angeles Times, her status shot upward and her power grew. Her column appeared in 85 metropolitan papers, 3,000 small-town dailies, and 2,000 weeklies. When she replaced John Chapman at The New York Daily News, she picked up an additional audience of 5,750,000 daily and 7,500,000 on Sunday. She appeared on weekly radio shows and wrote two best sellers: From Under My Hat and The Whole Truth and Nothing But.

Hedda’s large, flamboyant hats became her trademarks–she reportedly bought about 150 new hats a year. Hopper also acquired a reputation for journalistic bitchiness, which actually made her more popular. She took on anything or anyone who went against her set of “American” values. She doggedly spoke out against the threat of communism, real or imagined, in Hollywood. During the infamous “blacklisting” era, she destroyed the reputations of many people with hearsay.

She badgered Charlie Chaplin about the way he used women and America. She blasted Louis B. Mayer for lacking generosity. Her 10-year feud with her rival columnist Louella Parsons was legendary.  After publishing a “blind item” on Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy’s relationship, Tracy confronted her at Ciro’s and kicked her in the rear.  Similarly, after she had printed a story about an extramarital affair between Joseph Cotten and Deanna Durbin, Cotten ran into Hopper at a social event and pulled out her chair, only to continue pulling it out from under her when she sat down.

Hopper never remarried and lived to see her son, William (Bill) DeWolf Hopper Jr., achieve success as Paul Drake on the TV drama Perry Mason.

She died of pneumonia in 1966.  She is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery,Altoona, Pennsylvania.

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Hopper has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6313½ Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood.

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Sunset Boulevard – Required Viewing

I absolutely adore this film.  I think the first time I saw it was while sitting on the cold charcoal dust covered floor of the Fine Arts building at Interlochen Center For the Arts.  It was in the 35mm movie projector version and I have sensory flashbacks of that time when I see it again.  Billy Wilder is brilliant, Gloria Swanson is perfection, William Holden is mesmerizing and Erich von Stroheim is captivating.  Most likely, when you watch this film next, it will be on DVD, please do yourself a favor and watch the special features options, you will fall in love with the film even more.  Oh, and the scene where her friends come over to play bridge, she calls them “the waxworks,” and it’s played by Buster Keaton, Anna Q. Nilsson and H. B. Warner.sunset-boulevard

The Wiki:

Sunset Boulevard (also known as Sunset Blvd.) is a 1950 American film noir directed and co-written by Billy Wilder, and produced and co-written by Charles Brackett. It was named after the boulevard that runs through Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, California.

The film stars William Holden as Joe Gillis, an unsuccessful screenwriter, and Gloria Swanson as Norma Desmond, a faded silent movie star who draws him into her fantasy world where she dreams of making a triumphant return to the screen, with Erich von Stroheim as Max Von Mayerling, her butler and first husband. Nancy Olson, Fred Clark, Lloyd Gough and Jack Webb play supporting roles. Director Cecil B. DeMille and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper play themselves, and the film includes cameo appearances by leading silent film actors Buster Keaton, H. B. Warner and Anna Q. Nilsson.

Praised by many critics when first released, Sunset Boulevard was nominated for eleven Academy Awards and won three. It is widely accepted as a classic, often cited as one of the greatest films of American cinema. Deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1989, Sunset Boulevard was included in the first group of films selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 1998, it was ranked number twelve on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 best American films of the 20th century, and in 2007 it was 16th on their 10th Anniversary list.

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