Happy Birthday Diana Vreeland

Today is the 90th birthday of Diana Vreeland.  She was and continues to be the arbiter of style, even after her death 20+ years ago. Do yourself a favor and read “D.V.”:  her autobiography/manual of style/name-drop-a-thon book masquerading as a roller coaster ride through the early parts of the 20th century. It will seriously change your life. Watch “The Eye Has To Travel,” her documentary.  You will start to look at style as something you own, not something you follow and conform to.  She will teach you that the sexiest most attractive thing one can have and wear is confidence.   I absolutely adore her for the permission she gives people to be fashionable, be original, beautiful, without being ordinary or expected.  Wear some pearls today, wear your shirt back to front, do something original today.  Do it for yourself with a wink to Ms. Vreeland.

 

NAME: Diane Dalziel Vreeland
OCCUPATION: Journalist
BIRTH DATE: March 01, 1924
DEATH DATE: August 22, 1989
PLACE OF BIRTH: Paris, France

BEST KNOWN FOR: As a fashion journaist, Diana Vreeland was an influential figure in American fashion during the 20th century.

Diana Vreeland began her career at Harper’s Bazaar in 1936. Her column “Why Don’t You…?” was famous for offering outlandish fashion and lifestyle tips for the times. Vreeland later became the magazine’s fashion editor and established herself as one of the country’s leading arbiters of style. In 1962, Vreeland joined the staff of Vogue and continued to be a powerful force in the fashion world.

Fashion journalist. Born Diana Dalziel on March 1, 1924, in Paris, France. Diana Vreeland was an influential figure in American fashion during the twentieth century. The daughter of wealthy parents, she spent her early years in France before moving to New York as a teenager.

Diana Vreeland began her career as a columnist for Harper’s Bazaar in 1936. Her column “Why Don’t You . . . ?” was famous for offering outlandish fashion and lifestyle tips for the times. Few could afford in the Depression follow her advice. Moving up the editorial ladder, Vreeland became the magazine’s fashion editor, a post she held until the early 1960s. At Harper’s Bazaar, she established herself as one of the country’s leading arbiters of style.

In 1962, Diana Vreeland joined the staff of Vogue, another influential fashion magazine, as editor in chief. At Vogue, she continued to be a powerful force in the fashion world, often able to identify the coming trends, such as the popularity of the bikini. Vreeland also worked with many well-known photographers, such as Richard Avedon, in making the magazine.

While she left Vogue in 1971, Diana Vreeland did not leave the fashion world. She worked as a consultant for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, putting together fashion exhibitions. Vreeland died on August 22, 1989. Married to T. Reed Vreeland since 1924, she had two sons, Thomas R., Jr., and Frederick.

Personal Quotes:

“People who eat white bread have no dreams.”

“Blue jeans are the most beautiful things since the gondola.”

“Elegance is innate. It has nothing to do with being well dressed. Elegance is refusal.”

“I always wear my sweater back-to-front; it is so much more flattering.”

“I loathe narcissism, but I approve of vanity.”

“Pink is the navy blue of India.”

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Diana Vreeland – Style Icon

Diana Vreeland was and continues to be the arbiter of style, even after her death 20+ years ago. Do yourself a favor and read “D.V.”:  her autobiography/manual of style/name-drop-a-thon. It will seriously change your life. Watch “The Eye Has To Travel,” her documentary.  You will start to look at style as something you own, not something you follow and conform to. She will teach you that the sexiest most attractive thing one can have and wear is confidence. Ladies and gentlemen, Diana Vreeland. Style Icon.

NAME: Diane Dalziel Vreeland
OCCUPATION: Journalist
BIRTH DATE: March 01, 1924
DEATH DATE: August 22, 1989
PLACE OF BIRTH: Paris, France
BEST KNOWN FOR: As a fashion journaist, Diana Vreeland was an influential figure in American fashion during the 20th century.

Diana Vreeland began her career at Harper’s Bazaar in 1936. Her column “Why Don’t You…?” was famous for offering outlandish fashion and lifestyle tips for the times. Vreeland later became the magazine’s fashion editor and established herself as one of the country’s leading arbiters of style. In 1962, Vreeland joined the staff of Vogue and continued to be a powerful force in the fashion world.

Fashion journalist. Born Diana Dalziel on March 1, 1924, in Paris, France. Diana Vreeland was an influential figure in American fashion during the twentieth century. The daughter of wealthy parents, she spent her early years in France before moving to New York as a teenager.

Diana Vreeland began her career as a columnist for Harper’s Bazaar in 1936. Her column “Why Don’t You . . . ?” was famous for offering outlandish fashion and lifestyle tips for the times. Few could afford in the Depression follow her advice. Moving up the editorial ladder, Vreeland became the magazine’s fashion editor, a post she held until the early 1960s. At Harper’s Bazaar, she established herself as one of the country’s leading arbiters of style.

In 1962, Diana Vreeland joined the staff of Vogue, another influential fashion magazine, as editor in chief. At Vogue, she continued to be a powerful force in the fashion world, often able to identify the coming trends, such as the popularity of the bikini. Vreeland also worked with many well-known photographers, such as Richard Avedon, in making the magazine.

While she left Vogue in 1971, Diana Vreeland did not leave the fashion world. She worked as a consultant for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, putting together fashion exhibitions. Vreeland died on August 22, 1989. Married to T. Reed Vreeland since 1924, she had two sons, Thomas R., Jr., and Frederick.

Personal Quotes:

“People who eat white bread have no dreams.”

“Blue jeans are the most beautiful things since the gondola.”

“Elegance is innate. It has nothing to do with being well dressed. Elegance is refusal.”

“I always wear my sweater back-to-front; it is so much more flattering.”

“I loathe narcissism, but I approve of vanity.”

“Pink is the navy blue of India.”

Diana Vreeland by Horst P. Horst.

Image via Wikipedia

The Reason I QUIT

[i have backdated this post back to when i first started keeping notes and to 'hide' it in the blog when i finally post it.  today is that day]

I had an interview at a new store opening in Seattle on Tuesday with the guy that runs the stores worldwide and the woman that will be the Seattle Store Manager for the first three months.  I was offered a job on the spot and was told that I would be getting a call from the HR Director.  He called on on Thursday.  On Thursday, I was officially offered a new position with a new store opening in Seattle.  It was with the understanding that I needed to be in NYC at their Soho store training on Monday.  I have witnessed what happens when you put in your two weeks notice:  the Manager completely ignores you or treats you horribly for those two weeks.  I did not see the point.  So as soon as it was official, I submitted my resignation letter via email to my manager because she has been out sick for the last week and a half.

[manager's name]

Tomorrow, Friday December 13th will be my last day at [store name].

[my name]

Then on Friday when I showed up for work, the regional manager called and had the Store Assistant Manager walk me out.  I have still not received a response from the Store Manager to my resignation email, official or personal.  I am glad I didn’t stay two weeks.  This is the letter I wanted to send:

To Whom It May Concern,

After careful thought and consideration I have concluded that my position lacks any sort of career trajectory and my core values are not aligned with the dysfunctional organizational culture at the [store name]. If I want any sort of career future or growth, it is time to move on, if not only to maintain my health, sanity, and overall happiness.

This letter is to officially inform you that I resign from my position, my last day of work will be [date].

Over the past three years, I have witnessed favoritism, lies, incompetence, and immaturity that have gone ignored, unreported, and tolerated, all to the detriment of the health of the store comradery and the overall customer experience. Time and time again, my requests for help and assistance from a variety of individuals and departments have gone unanswered. This repeated lack of accountability and it’s acceptance have drastically hindered my ability to perform my duties efficiently. This unwillingness to supply any sort of guidance is blatantly incompetent and generally considered unacceptable at most companies.

I genuinely wish my experience at [store name] ended on a high note, but sadly, it ends in a general dismissive and belittling attitude from the store General Manager and my frustration as to why it is not being addressed by higher management.

Sincerely,

[my name]

Here are some of the details that have driven me to seek employment elsewhere (I have removed a lot of my notes, they seem pointless now.  I only kept the ones that I thought were interesting):

****

dec 22, 2012

I heard over the weekend that [the former assistant manager] has been writing negative things about his coworkers on Facebook. Not only is this the opposite if his team-building stance, it’s sabotaging the success of the store. When he says the employees are slow, people will tell other people and they will stop going or never go in the first place.

****

This is a screenshot of a text conversation the manager had with a sales associate after he quit to work at another store.  He still had customers texting him about things and he was attempting to loop her in so she could take over the contact.  She ignored his texts.

The times of these texts are important. She did not respond to his text until the next day or so, after I asked her directly about it.

*****

On the night of the large corporate visit, I was asked to come upstairs and make everyone espresso and then word was sent back that I was to change and go home.  I had spent 52 hours that week getting ready for the visit and the manager wanted me to clock out and leave through the alley entrance. I thought that since everyone worked so hard to make the place look spotless for the visit, it would have been nice to wait until the visitors had left and then celebrated as a team. She wanted me to use the back door so it would not disturb the visit. When I expressed my unhappiness at her instructions, the team was concerned and she told them not to text me after I had left.

****

This is a screenshot of a text message a sales associate received from the former assistant manager on accident.  He meant to send it to the store manager.  When the sales associate asked the assistant manager what the meaning was behind the text message, he and the manager had a talk and they told that sales associate that they told the regional manager about the text and it was taken care of.  No apologies, no noticeable HR contact.  Six months later, that assistant manager was promoted to the store manager in Aspen.

20121212-122839.jpg

****

15 Oct 2012

They told the sales associates today to not talk to me because it “distracts him from his job.” They told them that they watch the cameras and can see when they are talking to me. I spend most of the day working alone, not talking to anyone aside from work-related questions. From time to time, I will be upstairs and the security guard will ask me to cover him while he takes a bathroom break and I will talk with the sales associates. They look at me and then look at the cameras.  There is no way of knowing what we are talking about, it could be work questions and it happens so infrequently, I just think they don’t want us talking in general. Are they paranoid that we are comparing notes?

Of course they do not tell me I am not to distract the sales associates, so when I talk to them, they glance at the cameras and tell me they are not allowed to talk to me.

****

The former assistant manager (and part-time drag queen) got the manager position at a store in Aspen and continued his degrading facebook posts.  These are screenshots are his status updates and comments of my store manager and one coworker.

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The Assistant Manager (and drag queen) was promoted to Manager of a different store and this is one of the many negative facebook updates he posts about his staff.

20130531-210037.jpg

The manager commented on his post, reminding him she has been telling him that for years. How is this supposed to make the people that they manage feel?

5 Historical Misconceptions Rundown

5. Vikings

What would a Viking be without his trusty battle helmet and its impressive horns? The answer is: a more historically accurate viking.

Think, for a moment about wearing headgear like that into battle: the horns are just easy targets for your opponent to hit and knock off your helmet.

Or, if you strap on your helmet, now your opponent has a convenient lever with which to drag you to the ground and something to hold onto while slitting your throat.

Horned helmets are a terrible idea, which is why archeologists have never found them at viking battle sites and there’s no evidence that they were ever used.

It was poets and artists – people not known for caring about facts and reality – who gave the Vikings their silly hats during the late 1800s, long after the vikings could ‘correct’ their misconceptions.

4. Lady Godiva

The story of this 11th century English noblewoman is that her mean husband the Earl raised taxes on the townspeople of Coventry which Lady Godiva – and not surprising the locals – thought were too high.

She badgered her husband and he conceded in exasperation to lower the taxes if she rode through town naked – assuming that she never would, but she did.

Because people don’t likes taxes – even though they’re how civilization is purchased – Lady Godiva’s story lives on notably in the Godiva logo and in popular songs.

But while Lady Godiva was a real person and Coventry is a real town there is no record of her nude ride from the time when it happened – so we can assume the story is false. Just as with the Vikings, again poets and artists are to blame, who made up the tale long after Lady Godiva’s death.

3. Napoleon

Famously this tiny, tiny general – perhaps to compensate for his short stature – took control of France greatly expanded its influence and dubbed himself emperor.

Napoleon’s official height was indeed 5 foot 2 inches but at the time French inches were longer than English inches, so doing the unit conversion, Napoleon’s height should have been reported as 5’7 in England’s imperial units – which is short by today’s standard but was average or slightly above average in the early 1800s.

However England, with it’s eternal love for all things French, didn’t care and went the Napoleon-is-so-short-LOL version of the story in newspapers and cartoons.

Meanwhile, Napoleon was busy introducing the Metric System to France and the wider world to standardize measurements so this sort of confusion would never happen again – and thankfully the whole world now uses metric. Mostly. Sort of.

2. Roman Vomit

Ah, the Roman empire, so great and powerful, but corrupted by decadence from within. And what could be a better symbol of that decadence than the Vometorum: where Romans, after stuffing themselves with delicious foods, could vomit them all up to make room to feast anew.

Vometoria are real but this idea of them is not, though confusion is understandable because their name – Vomit-orium – seems to make their purpose so clear.

Even if for some reason you know latin – perhaps because you live in a country that insists you waste hundreds of hours of your life learning a dead, useless language – this knowledge still won’t help you because the root word ‘vomitum’ means ‘to spew forth’.

So what is it really? If you’ve ever been to a big stadium, like say, the ones made by the romans, you have already used a vometorium. This is what the vometoria are – the passageways that lets lots of people enter or exit at once. The people are what spews forth in the vometoria, not the contents of the people.

1. Columbus

There is so very much wrong with the common retelling of the story of Christopher Columbus that it’s hard to know where to begin, but the biggest misconception is that everyone else thought the world was flat, but Columbus was the only guy smart enough to know that it’s round.

It makes a daring story, but knowledge of a spherical earth goes back to at least 5,000 BC that’s six and a half thousand years before Columbus set sail – and that knowledge was never lost to western civilization. In 200 BC Eratosthenes calculated Earth’s circumference and his estimate was still well know and being used in Columbus’s time.

The argument Columbus had with queen Isabella was not over the shape of the earth, but of its size. Columbus estimated the Earth was much smaller than Queen Isabella and her scientific advisors did which was way he thought he could make it across the empty Atlantic to India.

But Columbus’s size estimate was wrong – again, just like Napoleon’s height – because of mixed up units.

However, his error did send him West to become the first European to discover America – as long as you ignore the hornless vikings who beat him by 500 years.

 

via http://blog.cgpgrey.com/5-historical-misconceptions-rundown/

Credits:

duncanh1vitenskapsmuseetniklashellerstedt,http://www.flickr.com/photos/sharif/3294264505/in/photostream/wentzelepsy,yeowatzupstignygaardjdhancockfrieldwolfgangstaudtpasukaru76,cleverclaire1983nikontinoAntony McCallumchainsawpandajpovey

Weekly Photo Challenge: Unfocused

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Unfocused.

This photo was taken by Kim Doyle of KDLStudio.com last year. I love the color and the super ghostly streaks we all have.

It’s also funny that everyone else is talking and laughing and I am posing? Puckering? I’m not sure what’s going on with me.

20120504-094451.jpg