Happy Birthday Oscar Niemeyer

Today is the 107th birthday of Oscar Niemeyer, perhaps the last of the real modernist architects.  His buildings look like film sets of what mid-century designers envisioned how futuristic utopian societies would live.  Except he gave us that utopia in the 1960’s, not requiring the wait.  The first time I saw photos of Brasilia, I was in fascinated and quickly fell in love with it, the whole concept of building a capital city from scratch was enthralling.   That opportunity has only happened once in modern history and Oscar Niemeyer used that chance to create an absolute masterpiece.  The world is a better place because Oscar was in it and still feels the loss that he has left.

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NAME: Oscar Ribeiro de Almeida Niemeyer Soares Filho
OCCUPATION: Architect
BIRTH DATE: December 15, 1907
DEATH DATE: December 05, 2012
PLACE OF BIRTH: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
PLACE OF DEATH: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
AKA: Oscar Ribeiro de Almeida Niemeyer
AKA: Oscar Niemeyer

Best Known For:  The work of Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer demonstrates his appreciation for free-flowing design. Examples include the Contemporary Art Museum in Niterói.

Early Career

Oscar Niemeyer was born Oscar Ribeiro de Almeida Niemeyer Soares Filho on December 15, 1907, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He grew up in a wealthy family without any aspirations toward being an architect, though he started drawing at an early age. “When I was very little,” he later recalled, “my mother said I used to draw in the air with my fingers. I needed a pencil. Once I could hold one, I have drawn every day since.” After graduating from Barnabitas College in 1923, Niemeyer wed a woman named Annita Baldo, to whom he would remain married until her death in 2004.

As a young man, Niemeyer worked for his father at a typography house for a short while before entering the Escola Nacional de Belas Artes, from which he graduated in 1934. Shortly before graduation, he joined the offices of Lúcio Costa, an architect from the Modernist school. Niemeyer worked with Costa on many major buildings between 1936 and 1943, including the design for Brazil’s Ministry of Education and Health building, which was part of a collaboration with Bauhaus director Le Corbusier. Costa and Niemeyer also worked together on Brazil’s iconic pavilion in the 1939 New York World’s Fair; legendary Mayor Fiorello La Guardia was so impressed with Niemeyer’s design that he declared him an honorary citizen of New York.

In 1941, Niemeyer launched his solo career by designing a series of buildings in a new suburb of Rio de Janeiro named Pampulha. Here, Niemeyer started developing some of his design trademarks, including the heavy use of concrete and a propensity toward curves. “I consciously ignored the highly praised right angle and the rational architecture of T-squares and triangles,” he said, “in order to wholeheartedly enter the world of curves and new shapes made possible by the introduction of concrete into the building process.”

Foto: Marcel Gautherot/IMS

United Nations Building

Niemeyer’s status as a rising star in the architectural world was confirmed when he was chosen to represent Brazil as part of the team to design the new headquarters of the United Nations in New York City; the final building was based primarily on Niemeyer’s design, with significant elements also taken from his old collaborator, Corbusier. Following the completion of the United Nations building in 1953, Niemeyer won an appointment as dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, but he was refused an American work visa by the United States government due to his membership in Brazil’s Communist Party.

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Brasilia Buildings

In 1956, Juscelino Kubitschek, the president of Brazil and a close friend of Niemeyer, came to the architect with a proposal, asking Niemeyer to become the new chief architect of public buildings in the country’s new capital, Brasilia, a Modernist civic metropolis being built from scratch in the interior of the country. Niemeyer eagerly accepted, designing buildings that went along with his utopian vision of government. “This was a liberating time,” he said. “It seemed as if a new society was being born, with all the traditional barriers cast aside …. when planning the government buildings for Brasilia I decided they should be characterized by their own structures within the prescribed shapes … I tried to push the potential of concrete to its limits, especially at the load-bearing points which I wanted to be as delicate as possible so that it would seem as if the palaces barely touched the ground.”

Niemeyer designed several buildings in Brasilia, including the presidential palace, the Brasília Palace Hotel, the Ministry of Justice building, the presidential chapel and the cathedral. After the inauguration of the new capital city in 1960, Niemeyer resigned from his position as the government’s chief architect and returned to private practice.

Communist Ideology

Niemeyer had become interested in Communist ideology as a youth and joined the Brazilian Communist Party in 1945. This became a serious problem in 1964, when the Brazilian military overthrew the government in a coup; Niemeyer, viewed by the army as an individual with dangerously left-wing sympathies, had his office ransacked. Spooked, the architect left the country of his birth a year later, in 1965, resettling in France and mainly designing buildings in Europe and northern Africa. He also turned to designing furniture, which also included his trademark use of sinuous curves. Niemeyer did not return to Brazil until the end of the military dictatorship in 1985.

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Later Years

Niemeyer received the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1988, the highest award in the profession, for his Cathedral of Brasilia. In his acceptance speech, Niemeyer explained his design philosophy: “My architecture followed the old examples—beauty prevailing over the limitations of the constructive logic. My work proceeded, indifferent to the unavoidable criticism set forth by those who take the trouble to examine the minimum details, so very true of what mediocrity is capable of. It was enough to think of Le Corbusier saying to me once while standing on the ramp of the Congress: ‘There is invention here.'”

Semi-retired since the mid-1980s, at the age of 103 Oscar Niemeyer still goes into his office every day to work on designs and oversee projects. Having outlived most of his old friends, intellectual sparring partners and his wife of 60 years, though he remarried in 2006, to his longtime assistant Vera Lucia Cabreira—Niemeyer continues to press for a better world through better design. “It is important,” he once said, “that the architect think not only of architecture but of how architecture can solve the problems of the world. The architect’s role is to fight for a better world, where he can produce an architecture that serves everyone and not just a group of privileged people.”

Niemeyer died in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on December 5, 2012. He was 104 years old. A funeral service was held in Brasilia, at the presidential palace he designed more than 50 years earlier.

Happy Birthday Frank Sinatra

Today is the 99th birthday of Frank Sinatra.  For some reason, I have always been fond of his version of “Stormy Weather” above all others.  It is from the decade he was with Columbia Records in 40’s and early 50’s and just so perfect.  The world is a better place because Frank was in it and still feels the loss that he has left.

NAME: Frank Sinatra
OCCUPATION: Film Actor, Singer
BIRTH DATE: December 12, 1915
DEATH DATE: May 14, 1998
PLACE OF BIRTH: Hoboken, New Jersey
PLACE OF DEATH: Los Angeles, California
NICKNAME: The Voice, The Sultan of Swoon, Ol’ Blue Eyes, The Chairman of the Board

BEST KNOWN FOR:  Frank Sinatra was one of the most popular entertainers of the 20th century, forging a career as an award-winning singer and film actor.

Francis Albert “Frank” Sinatra was born December 12, 1915, in Hoboken, New Jersey. The only child of Sicilian immigrants, a teenaged Sinatra decided to become a singer after watching Bing Crosby perform. He dropped out of high school, where he was a member of the glee club, and began to sing at local nightclubs. Radio exposure brought him to the attention of bandleader Harry James, with whom Sinatra made his first recordings, including “All or Nothing at All.” In 1940, Tommy Dorsey invited Sinatra to join his band. After two years of chart-topping success with Dorsey, Sinatra decided to strike out on his own.

Between 1943 and 1946, Sinatra’s solo career blossomed as the singer charted 17 different Top 10 singles. The mobs of bobby-soxer fans Sinatra attracted with his dreamy baritone earned him such nicknames as “The Voice” and “The Sultan of Swoon.” “It was the war years, and there was a great loneliness,” recalled Sinatra, who was unfit for military service due to a punctured eardrum. “I was the boy in every corner drugstore who’d gone off, drafted to the war. That was all.”

Sinatra made his movie acting debut in 1943, in Higher and Higher. In 1945, he won a special Academy Award for The House I Live In, a 10-minute short made to promote racial and religious tolerance on the home front. Sinatra’s popularity began to slide in the postwar years, however, leading to a loss of his recording and film contracts in the early 1950s. In 1953, he made a triumphant comeback, winning an Oscar for his portrayal of the Italian-American soldier Maggio in From Here to Eternity. Although this was his first non-singing role, Sinatra quickly found a vocal outlet when he received a new recording contract with Capitol Records in the same year. In his music, the Sinatra of the 1950s brought a more mature sound with jazzier inflections in his voice.

Having regained stardom, Sinatra enjoyed continued success in both film and music for years to come. He received critical acclaim for his performance in the original film of The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and an Academy Award nomination for his work in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955). Meanwhile, he continued to chart Top 10 singles. When his record sales began to dip by the end of the 1950s, Sinatra left Capitol to establish his own record label, Reprise. In association with Warner Bros., which later bought Reprise, Sinatra also set up his own independent film production company, Artanis.

By the mid-1960s, Sinatra was back on top again. He received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and headlined the 1965 Newport Jazz Festival with Count Basie’s Orchestra. This period also marked his Las Vegas debut, where he continued on for years as a main attraction at Caesars Palace. As a founding member of the “Rat Pack,” alongside Sammy Davis Jr., Dean Martin, Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop, Sinatra came to epitomize the hard-drinking, womanizing, gambling swinger—an image constantly reinforced by the popular press and Sinatra’s own albums. With his modern edge and timeless class, not to mention hits like 1968’s iconic “My Way,” even the radical youth had to pay Sinatra his due. As Jim Morrison of the Doors once said, “No one can touch him.”

After a brief retirement in the early 1970s, Sinatra returned to the music scene with the album “Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back” (1973) and also became more politically active. Having first visited the White House in 1944 while campaigning for Franklin D. Roosevelt in his bid for a fourth term in office, Sinatra worked eagerly for John F. Kennedy’s election in 1960 and later supervised JFK’s inaugural gala in Washington. The relationship between the two soured, however, after the president canceled a weekend visit to Sinatra’s house due to the singer’s connections to Chicago mob boss Sam Giancana. By the 1970s, Sinatra had abandoned his long-held Democratic loyalties and embraced the Republican Party, supporting first Richard Nixon and later his close friend Ronald Reagan, who presented Sinatra with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, in 1985.

Frank Sinatra married his childhood sweetheart, Nancy Barbato, in 1939. They had three children together—Nancy (born in 1940), Frank Sinatra Jr. (born in 1944) and Tina (born in 1948)—before their marriage unraveled in the late 1940s.

In 1951, Sinatra married actress Ava Gardner; after they split, Sinatra remarried a third time, to Mia Farrow, in 1966. That union, too, ended in divorce (in 1968), and Sinatra married for a fourth and final time in 1976, to Barbara Blakely Marx, the widow of comedian Zeppo Marx. The two remained together until Sinatra’s death more than 20 years later.

In October 2013, Mia Farrow, made headlines after stating that Sinatra could be the father of her 25-year-old son, Ronan, in an interview with Vanity Fair. Ronan is Farrow’s only official biological child with Woody Allen. Also during the interview, she called Sinatra the love of her life, saying, “We never really split up.” In response to the buzz surrounding his mother’s comments, Ronan jokingly tweeted: “Listen, we’re all *possibly* Frank Sinatra’s son.”

In 1987, author Kitty Kelley published an unauthorized biography of Sinatra, accusing the singer of relying on mob ties to build his career. Such claims failed to diminish Sinatra’s widespread popularity. In 1993, at the age of 77, Sinatra gained legions of new, younger fans with the release of Frank Sinatra Duets, a collection of 13 Sinatra standards that he rerecorded alongside the likes of Barbra Streisand, Bono, Tony Bennett and Aretha Franklin.

Sinatra performed in concert for the last time in 1995 at the Palm Desert Marriott Ballroom in California. On May 14, 1998, Frank Sinatra died of a heart attack at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 82 years old and had, at last, faced his final curtain. With a show business career that spanned more than 50 years, Sinatra’s continued mass appeal can best be explained in the man’s own words: “When I sing, I believe. I’m honest.”

Happy Birthday Dovima

Today is the 87th birthday of the woman you didn’t know you knew, Dovima.  Her iconic images from the 50’s help set the stylized tone that it is remembered for today.  Her story is truly American:  discovered on the streets of New York City, worked with the best photographers and designers in the world, immortalized in film.  The world is a better place because she was in it and still feels the loss that she has left.

 

NAME: Dovima
OCCUPATION: Model
BORN: December 11, 1927, New York City, NY
DIED: May 31, 1990, Fort Lauderdale, FL
SPOUSE: Casper West Hollingsworth (m. 1983–1986)
MOVIES: Funny Face
CHILDREN: Alison Murray

BEST KNOWN FOR:  Dorothy Virginia Margaret Juba, later known as Dorothy Horan, and best known as Dovima, was an American model during the 1950s.

Born in New York City, Dovima was discovered on a sidewalk in New York by an editor at Vogue, and had a photo shoot with Irving Penn the following day. She worked closely with Richard Avedon, whose photograph of her in a floor-length evening gown with circus elephants—”Dovima with the Elephants”—taken at the Cirque d’hiver, Paris, in August 1955, has become an icon. The gown was the first evening dress designed for Christian Dior by his new assistant, Yves Saint-Laurent.

Dovima was reputed to be the highest-paid model of her time. She had a cameo role as an aristocratic-looking, but empty-headed, fashion model with a Jackson Heights whine: Marion in Funny Face (Paramount, 1957).

Dovima gave birth to a daughter named Alison on July 14, 1958, in Manhattan. Alison’s father is Dovima’s second husband, Alan Murray.

She died of liver cancer on May 3, 1990 at the age of 62.

Happy Birthday Melvil Dewey

Today is the 164th birthday of Melvil Dewey.  We all know him from his categorizing of books in libraries using his namesake system.  I spent a lot of time in libraries as a kid, both my grandmothers were librarians.  Libraries were so quiet and cold.  I have fond memories of my time spent in a lot of them.  The world is a better place because Melvil was in it and still feels the loss that he has left.

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NAME: Melvil Dewey
OCCUPATION: Educator, Scholar, Journalist
BIRTH DATE: December 10, 1851
DEATH DATE: December 26, 1931
EDUCATION: Amherst College, Alfred University
PLACE OF BIRTH: Adams Center, New York
PLACE OF DEATH: Lake Placid, Florida

BEST KNOWN FOR: Melvil Dewey was a librarian and scholar who developed the Dewey Decimal System for cataloging books and other library materials.

Melville Louis Kossuth Dewey was born in Adams Center, New York, on December 10, 1851. Dewey took an interest in education and spelling reform from a young age. He changed his name to the more efficient “Melvil” and his last name to “Dui.” He attended Alfred University and Amherst College, from which he graduated with bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

Immediately after receiving his undergraduate degree, Dewey was hired to manage Amherst’s library and reclassify its collections. He came up with a system of decimal numbers used to classify a structure of knowledge first outlined by Sir Francis Bacon.

Dewey copyrighted the system in 1876. This system has proved to be enormously influential and remains in widespread use.

In 1877, Dewey moved to Boston, where he founded and became editor of The Library Journal. The journal became an influential factor in the development of libraries in America, and in the reform of their administration. Dewey was also among the founders of the American Library Association.

Dewey became librarian of Columbia College in 1883. The following year, he founded the School of Library Economy—the first school for librarians ever organized. When Dewey relocated to Albany in 1889, he took the school with him. It eventually returned to Columbia in 1926. Dewey also served as director of the New York State Library from 1888 to 1906. During his tenure he reorganized the state library and established a system of traveling libraries and picture collections.

Dewey founded the Lake Placid Club with his wife, Annie, in 1895, and helped to organize the Olympic Games there. The Lake Placid Club was a private institution with a policy of excluding Jews and other minorities. Close to 10 years later, the New York State Board of Regents received a petition demanding that Dewey be removed as State Librarian because of his ties to the Lake Placid Club. The Regents issued a formal rebuke, leading Dewey to resign his position in 1905.

In 1926, Melvil Dewey traveled to Florida to establish a new branch of the Lake Placid Club. He died on December 26, 1931, in Lake Placid, Florida.

Happy Birthday James Thurber

Today is James Thurber’s 120th birthday.  It is no secret that his book The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is one of my very favorites and it’s been made into a film.  I should reread it.  I identify with the heroic daydreamer aspect of the main character very much, he reminds me of Henry Darger (without the hundreds of watercolors of children being massacred).  Just a unassuming man, living an outwardly ordinary life with a vividly rich imagination.  I have included a link at the bottom to Audible where you can download the book for free and listen to it through the Audible App for Apple or Android devices.

NAME: James Thurber
OCCUPATION: Illustrator, Author
BIRTH DATE: December 08, 1894
DEATH DATE: November 02, 1961
EDUCATION: Ohio State University
PLACE OF BIRTH: Columbus, Ohio
PLACE OF DEATH: New York City, New York
FULL NAME: James Grover Thurber

BEST KNOWN FOR: James Thurber was an American cartoonist best known for his contributions to The New Yorker magazine.

This week is the birthday of James Thurber, born in Columbus, Ohio (1894). His father was an underpaid civil servant who worked too hard; his mother was a funny woman who loved to play jokes. When he was seven years old, he was playing with his brothers and was shot in the eye with a bow and arrow; he went completely blind in one eye, and struggled with his eyesight for the rest of his life.

He dropped out of Ohio State University, spent a couple of years during World War I working as a code clerk, and in 1925, he moved to Greenwich Village in New York City, getting a job as a reporter for the New York Evening Post. He joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1927 as an editor with the help of his friend and fellow New Yorker contributor, E.B. White. His career as a cartoonist began in 1930 when White found some of Thurber’s drawings in a trash can and submitted them for publication; White inked-in some of these earlier drawings to make them reproduce better for the magazine, and years later expressed deep regret that he had done such a thing. Thurber would contribute both his writings and his drawings to The New Yorker until the 1950s.

Thurber was married twice. In 1922, Thurber married Althea Adams. The marriage was troubled and ended in divorce in May 1935.  Adams gave Thurber his only child, his daughter Rosemary. Thurber remarried in June 1935 to Helen Wismer.

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He died in 1961, at the age of 66, due to complications from pneumonia, which followed upon a stroke suffered at his home. His last words, aside from the repeated word “God,” were “God bless… God damn,” according to Helen Thurber.

An annual award, the Thurber Prize, begun in 1997, honors outstanding examples of American humor. In 2008, The Library of America selected Thurber’s New Yorker story “A Sort of Genius” for inclusion in its two-century retrospective of American True Crime.
Thurber said, “Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility.”

Happy Birthday Diego Rivera

Today is the 128th birthday of the artist Diego Rivera.  His full name is a sentence.  I first experienced Diego Rivera at Interlochen Center for the Arts when I stumbled across a book of his work in the library.  I used to go to the library a lot in the summertime, it was cool and quiet and a nice place to read for a couple hours.  My aunt was the librarian, so that was nice.  I remember looking at the photographs of his murals and reading the dimensions and being absolutely amazed.  I remember loving the complexity in his artistry of simple subjects.  It is like he took his time to honor every detail of the task of bundling this basket of produce, it just was so wonderful to understand that art was partially bringing light to and celebrating the every day existence of everyone.  It became much more accessible and personal.  The world is a better place because Diego was in it and still feels the loss that he has left.

NAME: Diego Rivera
OCCUPATION: Painter
BIRTH DATE: December 08, 1886
DEATH DATE: November 24, 1957
EDUCATION: San Carlos Academy of Fine Arts
PLACE OF BIRTH: Guanajuato, Mexico
PLACE OF DEATH: Mexico City, Mexico

Diego María de la Concepción Juan Nepomuceno Estanislao de la Rivera y Barrientos Acosta y Rodríguez (December 8, 1886 – November 24, 1957) better known simply as Diego Rivera was a prominent Mexican painter born in Guanajuato, Guanajuato, an active communist, and husband of Frida Kahlo (1929–1939 and 1940–1954). His large wall works in fresco helped establish the Mexican Mural Movement in Mexican art. Between 1922 and 1953, Rivera painted murals among others in Mexico City, Chapingo, Cuernavaca, San Francisco, Detroit, and New York City.[1] In 1931, a retrospective exhibition of his works was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Rivera was an atheist. His mural Dreams of a Sunday in the Alameda depicted Ignacio Ramírez holding a sign which read, “God does not exist”. This work caused a furor, but Rivera refused to remove the inscription. The painting was not shown for 9 years – until Rivera agreed to remove the inscription. He stated: “To affirm ‘God does not exist’, I do not have to hide behind Don Ignacio Ramírez; I am an atheist and I consider religions to be a form of collective neurosis.”

Happy Birthday Louis Prima

Today is the 103rd birthday of Louis Prima.

louis primaNAME: Louis Prima
OCCUPATION: Actor, Trumpet Player, Singer, Songwriter
BIRTH DATE: December 7, 1911
DEATH DATE: August 24, 1978
PLACE OF BIRTH: New Orleans, Louisiana
PLACE OF DEATH: New Orleans, Louisiana

BEST KNOWN FOR: Louis Prima was an influential jazz trumpeter, singer and composer known for songs like “Sing, Sing, Sing,” “Angelina,” “Buona Sera” and “Jump, Jive an’ Wail.”

Louis Prima was born on December 7, 1911, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Though initially taking up the violin, Prima switched to the trumpet and began playing in city venues as a teen. By the mid-1930s, at the behest of bandleader Guy Lombardo, Prima had moved to New York City and formed his own band, the New Orleans Gang. By the end of the decade, Prima had switched to leading a big band known as the Gleeby Rhythm Orchestra with which he recorded.

Prima would come to be known not only for his trumpet playing and strong songwriting but also for his emotive, textured baritone, and as such invited comparison to iconic trumpet player and singer Louis Armstrong. In the mid-1930s Prima also composed one of the most well-known songs in popular jazz history–the pulsating, primal “Sing, Sing, Sing,” which would become a major hit for Benny Goodman. Prima appeared in films like You Can’t Have Everything (1937) and Rose of Washington Square (1939) as well.

Partner Keely Smith and Becoming ‘The Wildest!

After World War II, Prima scored a number of hits that played up his Italian heritage with a humorous bent, including “Angelina,” “Felicia No Capicia” and “Josephina, No Leana on the Bell.” In 1947, Prima met Dorothy Keely, a young jazz singer from Virginia. She eventually joined Prima’s band and was given the stage name Keely Smith. The two married, with Smith becoming Prima’s fourth spouse. The witty husband and wife team were known for their disarming onstage juxtaposition, as Smith exhibited a cool, calm presence in counterpoint to Prima’s hustle and bustle antics.

After a period of limited activity, the duo became one of the biggest acts in Las Vegas in the mid-1950s with a tour-de-force, electrifying act known as The Wildest. The rebirth came partially as a result of the influence of Sam Butera, a saxophonist who also hailed from New Orleans. Butera created a sonic palette for Prima’s new accompanying band The Witnesses that was a fusion of sounds with an emphasis on a shuffle beat.

Prima made his Capitol Records debut in 1956 with The Wildest!, which contained major hits like “Just a Gigolo/I Ain’t Got Nobody,” “The Lip,” “Buona Sera” and “Jump Jive an’ Wail.” (“Gigolo” would be covered by long-haired rocker David Lee Roth in the ’80s.) Prima recorded several albums under Capitol, with he and Smith winning a Grammy in 1958, costarring in the film Hey Boy! Hey Girl! the following year and singing for President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration. Despite the successes, the two divorced in 1961.

Prima and Butera’s act were soon joined by vocalist Gia Maione, who wed Prima in 1963. Prima recorded for his own imprint Prima One Magnagroove before starring in Walt Disney’s 1967 animated film The Jungle Book. Providing the voice of the swinging king of the apes, Louie, Prima recorded the classic “I Wan’na Be Like You,” with the movements of he and his band serving as inspiration for Disney animators. Prima later recorded songs for the Disney film The Rescuers (1977) that remained unreleased until the 2000s.

Prima continued to play together in Vegas for a time and by the ’70s had returned to New Orleans. In 1975, he underwent surgery to have a brain tumor removed and lapsed into a coma, in which he remained until his death in 1978. He was survived by Maione and their children Louis Jr. and Lena, both of whom have pursued musical careers as well.

Maione has worked to maintain the Prima estate and helped to keep his legacy alive in the pop culture canon, including overseeing his music’s usage in a number of films that have included Analyze This and Swingers. A 1999 documentary appeared on the musician’s life as well–Louis Prima: The Wildest.

FILMOGRAPHY AS ACTOR
Rafferty and the Gold Dust Twins (2-Feb-1975)
The Jungle Book (18-Oct-1967) [VOICE]
Twist All Night (12-Dec-1961)
Hey Boy! Hey Girl! (5-Aug-1959) · Himself
Senior Prom (Dec-1958) · Himself
Rose of Washington Square (5-May-1939) · Band Leader
Start Cheering (3-Mar-1938) · Himself
You Can’t Have Everything (3-Aug-1937)