Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

This week, I joined three Facebook Groups and started one:

The Port Orchard group consists mostly of people asking questions that a Google search could easily answer: Anyone know of an urgent care near by? (must not be that urgent if you can wait for Facebook replies). They also seem to be endlessly curious about car accidents, why various aid cars are at specific locations, and catching these two women that stole things from a place called Pet Town. Overall, being a part of the group has not made me feel any nostalgia for my home town or enriched my life in any way. It has made me very conscious of the time I spend on Facebook and evaluate if it brings any value.

The Columbia City group is a lot of complaining. Complaining about bad parking, complaining about vandalism (my assumption is that the vandals are not members of the group), complaining about someone stealing a ladder. There is no added value to my life being member of this group, but I will wait to leave the group because next weekend is SeaFair, and it’s gonna get real messy down here. A lot of people come down to see the hydroplane races and park all over the place. The posts could get interesting.

The Bent Car Guys group seemed like a potentially fun one to join, they seem to post a lot of photos of cars from car shows and ones they see around the city. I thought that maybe at some time, I could post a photo of the extra set of rims I have and see if I could sell them. They post a lot of photos of old crappy cars. I will remain a member, it could just be an off week.

As I troll through the groups I have become members of, I am reminded of that very famous quote of Groucho Marx’s:

“I sent the club a wire stating, PLEASE ACCEPT MY RESIGNATION. I DON’T WANT TO BELONG TO ANY CLUB THAT WILL ACCEPT PEOPLE LIKE ME AS A MEMBER.”
– Telegram to the Friar’s Club of Beverly Hills to which he belonged, as recounted in Groucho and Me (1959)

This week, on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of Aldous Huxley, Stanley Kubrick, Vivian Vance, Maxfield Parrish, Amelia Earhart, Zelda Fitzgerald, Sandra Gould, Raymond Chandler, Alexander Calder, Edward Hopper, Oscar de la Renta and Ernest Hemingway.

The Stats:

Views This Week: 818
Total Views: 119,197
Total Subscribers: 319
Most Popular Post: Banned Books That Shaped America: Catch-22

Over on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted photos of abandoned shopping malls, beautiful drawing of the world’s subway maps, some new uses for duct tape, the art of Banksy, George Condo, Frank Stella, Keith Haring and Ricardo Romero Cortez Duque.

The Stats:

Posts This Week: 47
Total Posts: 2,643
Total Subscribers: 187
Most Popular Post: Happy Birthday Edward Hopper.

This week over on @TheRealSpa on Twitter, I tweeted:

 

 

The Stats:

Total Tweets: 307 (auto-deleted tweets older than 31 days to preserve freshness)
Total Following: 258
Total Following: 193

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I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
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I have created a Facebook blog group at facebook.com/groups/blogpostfeed/
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Happy Birthday Zelda Fitzgerald

 

Today is the birthday of writer and socialite Zelda Fitzgerald, born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama (1900). She was named after the fictional gypsy heroine in Zelda’s Fortune (1874), one of her mother’s favorite books. She was the youngest of five children, and she rebelled against the strict discipline of her father, an Alabama Supreme Court judge. She snuck out of her window at night, smoked cigarettes, bobbed her hair, and wore a flesh-colored swimsuit so that people would think she was swimming nude. She spent her evenings at dances and parties with the officers stationed at nearby Camp Sheridan, and they competed for her attention. One officer performed the full manual of arms drill outside her door, and others took turns trying to outdo each other with fancy airplane stunts in the sky above the Sayre household.

It was at Camp Sheridan that Zelda met a young officer named Scott Fitzgerald. He was beautiful, like Zelda — they were both petite, with blond hair and light eyes. Years later, in her autobiographical novel Save Me the Waltz (1932), she wrote: “He smelled like new goods. Being close to him with her face in the space between his ear and his stiff army collar was like being initiated into the subterranean reserves of a fine fabric store exuding the delicacy of cambrics and linen and luxury bound in bales.” Scott and Zelda spent a lot of time together, but she didn’t want to commit to him; even though he was confident that he was going to be rich and famous, Zelda was hesitant, and her parents were unconvinced. She wrote to him: “Mamma knows that we are going to be married some day — But she keeps leaving stories of young authors, turned out on a dark and stormy night, on my pillow — I wonder if you hadn’t better write to my Daddy — just before I leave — I wish I were detached — sorter without relatives. I’m not exactlyscared of ‘em, but they could be so unpleasant about what I’m going to do.”

After the publication of Fitzgerald’s first novel, This Side of Paradise(1920), Zelda agreed to marry Scott. They became the most famous couple of the Jazz Age. They were the center of attention at parties, where their drunken exploits became the stuff of legend.

Zelda was a writer in her own right, and Scott borrowed from her ideas and sometimes copied writing from her verbatim. When they were dating in Montgomery, Zelda showed Scott her diary, and he used that and her letters in This Side of Paradise. He had modeled the main character, Rosalind, after a woman he had been in love with at Princeton, named Ginevra King; but after meeting Zelda, he reworked the character of Rosalind until she was a combination of both women.

When Zelda was hired to write a review of The Beautiful and the Damned for the New York Herald Tribune, she wrote: “It seems to me that on one page I recognized a portion of an old diary of mine which mysteriously disappeared shortly after my marriage, and also scraps of letters which, though considerably edited, sound to me vaguely familiar. In fact, Mr. Fitzgerald — I believe that is how he spells his name — seems to believe that plagiarism begins at home.” She also encouraged readers to buy the book so that Scott could buy her a new dress and a platinum ring.

She said, “I don’t want to live — I want to love first, and live incidentally.”

The Great Gatsby

Once, I went to a reading of the entire The Great Gatsby.  It took about eight hours and at least a half dozen people to play all the parts.  When they got to the last paragraph, we all recited it together.  It was intense and glorious and beautiful.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And then one fine morning—
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.

 

 

It was on this day in 1925 that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby was published. Fitzgerald believed he had written a great book, and he was disappointed by its reception. He wrote to his friend Edmund Wilson: “Of all the reviews, even the most enthusiastic, not one had the slightest idea what the book was about.”

Fitzgerald was already famous when The Great Gatsby was published. His first novels, This Side of Paradise (1920) and The Beautiful and the Damned (1922), sold well. Scott and his wife, Zelda, were celebrities — a beautiful, fashionable, social couple. After watching them ride down Fifth Avenue on top of a taxi, writer Dorothy Parker said, “They did both look as though they had just stepped out of the sun.” Shortly after the publication of The Beautiful and the Damned, Fitzgerald wrote to his editor, Maxwell Perkins: “I want to write something new — something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.”But first he wrote a play, The Vegetable, and it was a flop. To pay off his debts, he churned out magazine stories. He wrote to a friend: “I really worked hard as hell last winter — but it was all trash and it nearly broke my heart as well as my iron constitution.” He had high hopes for a new book. He wrote to Perkins: “In my new novel I’m thrown directly on purely creative work — not trashy imaginings as in my stories but the sustained imagination of a sincere yet radiant world.”

The Fitzgeralds’ extravagant New York lifestyle was weighing on them, and in the spring of 1924, the couple and their young daughter headed to Europe, where Scott was looking for somewhere quieter and less expensive to work on The Great Gatsby. (Fitzgerald’s idea of a quiet lifestyle was relative; of his 1926 visit to the Riviera, he wrote: “There was no one at Antibes this summer, except me, Zelda, the Valentinos, the Murphys, Mistinguet, Rex Ingram, Dos Passos, Alice Terry, the MacLeishes, Charlie Brackett, Mause Kahn, Lester Murphy, Marguerite Namara, E. Oppenheimer, Mannes the violinist, Floyd Dell, Max and Crystal Eastman … Just the right place to rough it, an escape from the world.”)

After a stay in Paris, they headed south to the town of Valescure on the French Riviera, which Fitzgerald called the “hot sweet south of France.” In those days, the Riviera was cheap, and they rented a villa on a hillside. He described the Mediterranean: “Fairy blue [...] and in the shadow of the mountains a green belt of land runs along the coast for a hundred miles and makes a playground for the world.” They went to fancy dinners with rich friends, listened to jazz on the phonograph, and lay in the sun drinking. Fitzgerald worked on The Great Gatsby, writing to Perkins that the south of France was idyllic and that he would finish the novel within a month. Zelda was not so happy; Scott was too busy with his novel to pay attention to her, and their daughter was watched by a nurse. She distracted herself by flirting with a French naval officer, and the Fitzgeralds’ marriage deteriorated.

They moved to Rome that fall, where Scott made final edits on The Great Gatsby. He couldn’t decide on a title — he considered On the Road to West Egg, Gold-hatted Gatsby, Among the Ash-Heaps and Millionaires, The High-bouncing Lover, Trimalchio, and others. While the book was in publication, Fitzgerald suddenly came up with Under the Red White and Blue, and Perkins had to convince him that it was not worth delaying publication and that they should stick with The Great Gatsby.

When The Great Gatsby was published on this day in 1925, it cost $2.00. The reviews were mostly good, but sales were bad — after the initial run of 20,000 copies, there was a second printing of 3,000 copies in August, but some of those copies were still in the warehouse when Fitzgerald died 15 years later. He told Perkins that he thought there were two reasons for the book’s failure: that the title wasn’t very good, and that there were no strong female characters and women were the ones buying fiction. A few years before he died, Fitzgerald went from bookstore to bookstore trying to find copies of his books for his lover Sheilah Graham, but he couldn’t find any.

In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald wrote: “There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.”

 

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Rear View Mirror – My Week In Review

My old phone broke, so I got a replacement (pay the insurance, just do it) and ALL the photos that were saved the the cloud/dropbox were automatically uploaded to it.  The cloud is a hoarder, it keeps everything.  Everything.  Photos I deleted, photos that were emailed and texted to me (ya, think about that for a minute), just ones that I saved for a second to send to someone as a joke.  All up there in that messy, cluttered cloud.  So you can imagine my surprise as they all came rushing back to my phone.  I have always secretly prided myself in keeping a minimal number of photos on my phone, most people I know have over five thousand.  Even if a picture only said one word, that would still be way too many words.

I have swiped through the photos and made some InstaFrames and a Flipagram to show what I am currently storing in my phone.

I seriously had a topic that I wanted to touch on this Rear View Mirror, oh what was it? I think it had to do with the pro’s and con’s of solar-powered Christmas lights. Pros: They don’t plug in to the house and cost zero dollars in energy. Cons: You don’t realize they are still on until you have taken your shoes off and it is March 15th and you are “that house” in the neighborhood.

Or was it about how my bank is blocking every attempt at me paying my new gym memberships and they cannot tell me why? I have called and even visited US Bank to ask, they do not know why and their solution was to issue me a new debit card. My solution was to find a new bank. In other gym-related news, today marks exactly two months that I have been trying to break up with Seattle Executive Fitness and they are not honoring my requests and are still trying to charge my card. Luckily, my bank is also blocking them.

Was it about how I think that the Seattle SeaFair Pirates probably could have skipped firing their cannon during yesterday’s St. Patrick’s parade? Seeing as hearing loud explosions and police car sirens in a downtown metropolitan area made everyone who could not see the parade assume a series of terrorist bombs were being detonated.

Was I going to

This week on Waldina, I celebrated the birthdays of Charlie Chaplin, Diane Arbus, Liza Minnelli, Jack Kerouac, Kim Stanley and Dorothy Gish.

The Stats:

Total Views: 105,499
Views This Week: 870
Most Popular Post: Doris Duke – Style Icon
Total Posts: 1,047
Total Subscribers: 264

This week on Wasp & Pear on Tumblr, I posted minimalist movie posters, the art of George Condo, photos of cameras, vintage letterhead, the daily new randomly generated wallpaper, a couple gifs, random pages from the 1972 Sears catalog, vintage Seattle photographs and the gravestone of Francis Scott Key Fitzerald and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald. I celebrated the birthdays of Max Shulman, Sylvia Beach and Albert Einstein.

The Stats:

Total Posts: 1,891
Posts This Week: 37
Total Subscribers: 161
Most Popular Post This Week: The “Endolyne” Streetcar

This week at @TheRealSPA on Twitter, I tweeted the standard shit talk and cross-posts from Waldina, Tumblr, and Instagram. I also posted a warning about the Ides of March reenacted with Lego characters and I suggested people read Lady Gaga’s charity “Born This Way” tax disclosure (not good).

The Stats:

Total Tweets: 1,081
Following: 298
Followers: 94

This week, I watched this video. I love both Amanda Sings and Flula, so this duet was a dream I have always been afraid to dream:

I chronicle what inspires me at Waldina.com
I faceplace at facebook.com/parkeranderson
I store my selfies at instagram.com/therealspa#
I tumblr at waspandpear.tumblr.com/
I tweet at twitter.com/TheRealSPA
I ADN at alpha.app.net/spa

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Happy Birthday F. Scott Fitzgerald – Style Icon

f-scottfitzgerald

Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy.

Today is the 117th birthday of F. Scott Fitzgerald, born Francis Scott Fitzgerald in St. Paul, Minnesota (1896). The son of a would-be furniture manufacturer who never quite made it big in business, Fitzgerald grew up feeling like a “poor boy in a rich town,” in spite of his middle-class upbringing. This impression was only strengthened when he attended Princeton, paid for by an aunt, where he was enthralled by the leisure class, tried out and was cut from the football team, and fell in love with a beautiful young socialite who would marry a wealthy business associate of her father’s. By the time Fitzgerald dropped out of college and entered the Army — wearing a Brooks Brothers-tailored uniform — it was little wonder he called the autobiographical novel he was writing The Romantic Egotist.

Fitzgerald’s time at an officer training camp in Alabama didn’t turn out as he’d hoped, either; the war ended before he ever made it to Europe, his book was rejected, and when he failed to make it big in New York City, his new debutante girlfriend, Zelda Sayre, called off their engagement.

Fitzgerald was probably much like most young men of his generation who dreamed of being a football star, the war hero, the wealthy big shot, the guy who gets the girl, but he actually had talent, drive, and an unshakeable faith that he could translate all that familiar yearning into something new. His revised book, This Side of Paradise, was a triumphant success. Requests for his writing came pouring in, Zelda married him, and the two of them — a Midwesterner and a Southerner — became the quintessential New York couple, the epitome of the Jazz Age, a term Fitzgerald himself coined. And although they eventually died separated, she in a mental hospital, he in debt and obscurity, Fitzgerald’s two greatest regrets remained, for the rest of his life, having failed to serve overseas and play Princeton football.

He said, “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.”

And his daughter, “Scottie” Fitzgerald, said about her parents, “People who live entirely by the fertility of their imaginations are fascinating, brilliant and often charming, but they should be sat next to at dinner parties, not lived with.”

scott and zelda

Rear View Mirror – My Week in Review

For no explainable reason, this morning, I traveled down the internet rabbit hole and ended up looking for vintage Sears and JC Pennys catalog scans from 1969-1970.  I figured I may as well make the time useful, so here are some that I found.

For a person that grandly professes to not believe in anything (gods, angels, ghosts, fortune cookies, horoscopes, etc), I certainly do find myself superstitious about writing about anything before it happens.  Jinxing it, so to speak.  That’s as much as I can muster.  I’ve said too much.

I have also started saving all the birthdays of the Style Icons that I archive on Waldina into a Google Calendar.  I am not sure if I will make it sharable (no one will really be that interested) or if it is just for my own interest.  I have a feeling that I will do it for my own interest and if anyone else happens to come alone, they are more than welcome.

At Wasp & Pear on Tumblr this week, we celebrated Montgomery Clift, Tippi Hendren, Leigh Bowery, Case Study Houses, Lewis Hine, Louise Brooks, Doris Day, Paul Newman, Eva Marie Saint, Cecil Beaton, Cal Worthington, Leo Tolstoy, and of course abandoned places.

The Stats:

Total Followers:  99
New Followers:   1
Total Posts:  927
New Posts:  34

At Waldina, we chronicled Zelda Fitzgerald, a hidden NYC subway station, and Gidget and the Gories.

The Stats:

Total Followers:  211
Total Hits:  94,562
Total Comments:  1,311
Total Posts:  857

Zelda Fitzgerald – Words To Live By

zelda-ballet
“She refused to be bored chiefly because she wasn’t boring.”

Zelda Fitzgerald, The Collected Writings

Happy Birthday Zelda Fitzgerald

Today is the birthday of writer and socialite Zelda Fitzgerald, born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama (1900). She was named after the fictional gypsy heroine in Zelda’s Fortune (1874), one of her mother’s favorite books. She was the youngest of five children, and she rebelled against the strict discipline of her father, an Alabama Supreme Court judge. She snuck out of her window at night, smoked cigarettes, bobbed her hair, and wore a flesh-colored swimsuit so that people would think she was swimming nude. She spent her evenings at dances and parties with the officers stationed at nearby Camp Sheridan, and they competed for her attention. One officer performed the full manual of arms drill outside her door, and others took turns trying to outdo each other with fancy airplane stunts in the sky above the Sayre household.

It was at Camp Sheridan that Zelda met a young officer named Scott Fitzgerald. He was beautiful, like Zelda — they were both petite, with blond hair and light eyes. Years later, in her autobiographical novel Save Me the Waltz (1932), she wrote: “He smelled like new goods. Being close to him with her face in the space between his ear and his stiff army collar was like being initiated into the subterranean reserves of a fine fabric store exuding the delicacy of cambrics and linen and luxury bound in bales.” Scott and Zelda spent a lot of time together, but she didn’t want to commit to him; even though he was confident that he was going to be rich and famous, Zelda was hesitant, and her parents were unconvinced. She wrote to him: “Mamma knows that we are going to be married some day — But she keeps leaving stories of young authors, turned out on a dark and stormy night, on my pillow — I wonder if you hadn’t better write to my Daddy — just before I leave — I wish I were detached — sorter without relatives. I’m not exactlyscared of ‘em, but they could be so unpleasant about what I’m going to do.”

After the publication of Fitzgerald’s first novel, This Side of Paradise(1920), Zelda agreed to marry Scott. They became the most famous couple of the Jazz Age. They were the center of attention at parties, where their drunken exploits became the stuff of legend.

Zelda was a writer in her own right, and Scott borrowed from her ideas and sometimes copied writing from her verbatim. When they were dating in Montgomery, Zelda showed Scott her diary, and he used that and her letters in This Side of Paradise. He had modeled the main character, Rosalind, after a woman he had been in love with at Princeton, named Ginevra King; but after meeting Zelda, he reworked the character of Rosalind until she was a combination of both women.

When Zelda was hired to write a review of The Beautiful and the Damned for the New York Herald Tribune, she wrote: “It seems to me that on one page I recognized a portion of an old diary of mine which mysteriously disappeared shortly after my marriage, and also scraps of letters which, though considerably edited, sound to me vaguely familiar. In fact, Mr. Fitzgerald — I believe that is how he spells his name — seems to believe that plagiarism begins at home.” She also encouraged readers to buy the book so that Scott could buy her a new dress and a platinum ring.

She said, “I don’t want to live — I want to love first, and live incidentally.”

Rear View Mirror – My Week in Review

It is a lot easier to remove paint from your body if you have applied a layer of sunblock first.  If I had written that last sentence any other weekend, no wild assumptions would have been made as to why I was wearing body paint.  I am actually just painting the little green house (now to be known as “The Little Brown House” or “Brown House” or “‘lil Brown”).  Until yesterday, I had successfully gone through my life without painting a house.  It is totally fun for the first hour and a half, then it gets real boring, then it sucks, then it will never fucking end and you are covered in paint and leaves and sweat.  I have also learned that painting your house is a great way to meet the neighbors.  They will yell from the other side of the street, asking you questions like “brown?” and “painting the whole thing, are you?”  They will provided valuable feedback from their front porch, such as “I wouldn’t have chosen that color” and “you’re gonna need another coat.”  And I get to do it all again today.  I would have taken pics of my painty-leafy-scratchy body, but I was afraid to get paint on my phone.

Last week, I also dumped Apple and AT&T and seriously haven’t looked back.  I switched to Credo Mobile and a Samsung Galaxy S4.  Once you leave your iPhone behind, you realize how much Apple is not letting you do, it is ridiculous.  Once you leave AT&T you realize how they donate to everything that is not who you are.  Double-plus ridiculous.  Credo Mobile breaks it down like this:

At CREDO, we fight the right—with a network of 3 million activists and with millions of dollars raised annually for nonprofits like Planned Parenthood, Defenders of Wildlife, Democracy Now, Global Fund for Women and the ACLU, to name a few. We put our mouth — and our money — where our values are.  Join the fight.  Join CREDO Mobile, America’s only progressive phone company.

I have not noticed any reception problems or any other issues that I would tell others to be aware of before switching.  If you are wondering if you should make the jump, go HERE and check out the phones and plans.  You will also get 25% off your monthly voice charge (about $10 if you sign up for 700 anytime minutes) for the first year.

I should really make an Instagram video.  Ok.  I did and it is even Rear View Mirror related.  Watch it HERE.

This week, over at Waldina.com, we suggested some classic reads for your summertime relaxation, celebrated Isabella Rossellini and George Orwell and Zelda Fitzgerald, cautioned you about some ingredients in processed foods to consider avoiding, and reaffirmed my staunch atheism by completely ignoring the rules of the Daily Writing Prompt.

While that was happening, Wasp & Pear celebrated abandoned places, Keith Haring, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, Go Ask Alice, Screwball Comedies, Beth Dito, Barbra Streisand, Brasilia, Cher, Mrs. de Florian, Kurt Cobain and Agnes Moorehead.  Figure out that dinner party seating, I dare you.

In the news, a lot of stuff happened and you know that because you do not live under a rock.  I don’t live under a rock mostly because the wifi signal is too weak.  Even if I did live under a rock, I would probably be painting that rock this weekend because that’s how life works.

I am still more or less obsessed with this song/video for summer:

That’s all.  I have an eight hour Karate Kid remake to produce.  Wax on.  Wax off.  Repeat.

Zelda Fitzgerald – Style Icon


Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre (“Sayre” is pronounced to rhyme with “fair”) in Montgomery, Alabama, was an American novelist and the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. She was an icon of the 1920s—dubbed by her husband “the first American Flapper”. After the success of his first novel, This Side of Paradise (1920), the Fitzgeralds became celebrities. The newspapers of New York saw them as embodiments of the Jazz Age and the Roaring Twenties: young, seemingly wealthy, beautiful, and energetic.

Even as a child her audacious behavior was the subject of Montgomery gossip. Shortly after finishing high school, she met F. Scott Fitzgerald at a dance. A whirlwind courtship ensued. Though he had professed his infatuation, she continued seeing other men. Despite fights and a prolonged break-up, they married in 1920, and spent the early part of the decade as literary celebrities in New York. Later in the 1920s, they moved to Europe, recast as famous expatriates of the Lost Generation. While Scott received acclaim for The Great Gatsby and his short stories, and the couple socialized with literary luminaries like Ernest Hemingway, their marriage was a tangle of jealousy, resentment and acrimony. Scott used their relationship as material in his novels, even lifting snippets from Zelda’s diary and assigning them to his fictional heroines. Seeking an artistic identity of her own, Zelda wrote magazine articles and short stories, and at 27 became obsessed with a career as a ballerina, practicing to exhaustion.

The strain of her tempestuous marriage, Scott’s increasing alcoholism, and her growing instability presaged Zelda’s admittance to the Sheppard Pratt sanatorium in 1930. She was diagnosed with schizophrenia. While in the Towson, Maryland, clinic, she wrote a semi-autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, which was published in 1932. Scott was furious that she had used material from their life together, though he would go on to do the same, as in Tender Is the Night, published in 1934; the two novels provide contrasting portrayals of the couple’s failing marriage.

Back in America, Scott went to Hollywood where he tried screenwriting and began a relationship with the movie columnist Sheilah Graham. In 1936, Zelda entered the Highland Mental Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina. Scott died in Hollywood in 1940, having last seen Zelda a year and a half earlier. She spent her remaining years working on a second novel, which she never completed, and she painted extensively. In 1948, the hospital at which she was a patient caught fire, causing her death. Interest in the Fitzgeralds resurged shortly after her death: the couple has been the subject of popular books, movies and scholarly attention. After a life as an emblem of the Jazz Age, Roaring Twenties, and Lost Generation, Zelda Fitzgerald posthumously found a new role: after a popular 1970 biography portrayed her as a victim of an overbearing husband, she became a feminist icon.