Happy 85th Birthday Elizabeth Taylor

Today is the 85th  birthday of Elizabeth Taylor.  Everything has already been said and everything should be said about Elizabeth Taylor.  Pick one of her films and watch it and re-fall in love with her.  I can’t even decide which one it should be.  Cat? Place? BUtterfield? Suddenly? Giant? Just watch one.  The world is a better place because she was in it and still feels the loss that she has left.

NAME: Elizabeth Taylor
OCCUPATION: Film Actress
BIRTH DATE: February 27, 1932
DEATH DATE: March 23, 2011
PLACE OF BIRTH: London, England
PLACE OF DEATH: Los Angeles, California
NICKNAME: Liz Taylor
FULL NAME: Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, DBE
REMAINS: Buried, Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery, Glendale, CA
OSCAR for Best Actress 1961 for Butterfield 8
OSCAR for Best Actress 1967 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
GOLDEN GLOBE 1960 for Suddenly, Last Summer
GOLCEN GLOBE 1974 World Film Favorite, Female
AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 1993
DAME OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE 2000
KENNEDY CENTER HONOR 2002
HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME 6336 Hollywood Blvd.

BEST KNOWN FOR: Actress Elizabeth Taylor starred in films like Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Butterfield 8, but was just as famous for her violet eyes and scandalous love life.

Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor was born on February 27, 1932, in London, England. One of film’s most celebrated stars, Elizabeth Taylor has fashioned a career that’s covered more than six decades, accepting roles that have not only showcased her beauty, but her ability to take on emotionally charged characters.

Taylor’s American parents, both art dealers, were residing in London when she was born. Soon after the outbreak of World War II, the Taylors returned to the United States and settled into their new life in Los Angeles.

“One problem with people who have no vices is that they’re pretty sure to have some annoying virtues.” – Elizabeth Taylor

Performance was in Taylor’s blood. Her mother had worked as an actress until she married. At the age of 3, the young Taylor started dancing, and eventually gave a recital for Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. Not long after relocating to California a family friend suggested the Taylors’ daughter take a screen test.

She soon signed a contract with Universal Studios, and made her screen debut at the age of 10 in There’s One Born Every Minute (1942). She followed that up with a bigger role in Lassie Come Home (1943) and later The White Cliffs of Dover (1944).

Her breakout role, however, came in 1944 with National Velvet, in a role Elizabeth Taylor spent four months working to get. The film subsequently turned out to be a huge hit that pulled in more than $4 million and made the 12-year-old actress a huge star.

In the glare of the Hollywood spotlight, the young actress showed she was more than adept at handling celebrity’s tricky terrain. Even more impressive was the fact that, unlike so many child stars before and after her, Taylor proved she could make a seamless transition to more adult roles.

“It would be glamorous to be reincarnated as a great big ring on Liz Taylor’s finger.” – Andy Warhol

Her stunning looks helped. At just 18 she played opposite Spencer Tracy in Father of the Bride (1950). Taylor also showed her acting talents in 1954 with three films: The Last Time I Saw Paris, Rhapsody, and Elephant Walk, the latter of which saw Taylor take on the role of a plantation owner’s wife who is in love with the farm’s manager.

Her personal life only boosted the success of her films. For a time she dated millionaire Howard Hughes, then at the age of 17, Elizabeth Taylor made her first entrance into marriage, when she wed hotel heir, Nicky Hilton.

The union didn’t last long and, in 1952, Taylor was walking down the aisle again—this time to marry actor Michael Welding. In all, Taylor has married eight times during life, including twice to actor Richard Burton.

While her love life continued to make international headlines, Taylor continued to shine showed as an actress.

She delivered a riveting performance in the drama A Place in the Sun, and turned things up even more in 1956 with the film adaptation of the Edna Ferber novel, Giant that co-starred James Dean. Two years later, she sizzled on the big screen in the film adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. The following year, she starred in another Williams classic, Suddenly Last Summer. Taylor earned her first Oscar, capturing the coveted Best Actress award for her role as call girl in BUtterfield 8 (1960).

But Taylor’s fame was also touched by tragedy and loss. In 1958, she became a young widow when her husband, pioneering film producer Mike Todd, was killed in a plane crash. After his death, Taylor became embroiled in one of the greatest Hollywood love scandals of the era when she began an affair with Todd’s close friend, Eddie Fisher. Fisher divorced Debbie Reynolds and married Taylor in 1959. The couple stayed married for five years until she left Fisher for actor Richard Burton.

The public’s obsession with Taylor’s love life hit new heights with her 1964 marriage to Richard Burton. She’d met and fallen in love with the actor during her work on Cleopatra (1963), a film that not only heightened Taylor’s clout and fame, but also proved to be a staggering investment, clocking in at an unprecedented $37 million to make.

The Taylor-Burton union was a fiery and passionate one. They appeared onscreen together in the much-panned The V.I.P.’s (1963), and then again two years later for the heralded Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, a film that earned Taylor her second Oscar for her role as an overweight, angry wife of an alcoholic professor, played by Burton.

The subsequent years proved to be an up-and-down affair for Taylor. There were more marriages, more divorces, health obstacles, and a struggling film career, with movies that gained little traction with critics or the movie-going public.

Still, Taylor continued to act. She found work on television, even making a guest appearance on General Hospital, and on stage. She also began focusing more attention on philanthropy. After her close friend Rock Hudson died in 1985 following his battle with HIV/AIDS, the actress started work to find a cure for the disease. In 1991 she launched the Elizabeth Taylor HIV/AIDS Foundation in order to offer greater support for those who are sick, as well fund research for more advanced treatments.

Largely retired from the world of acting, Taylor received numerous awards for her body of work. In 1993 she received the American Film Institute’s Life Achievement Award. In 2000 she was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE).

Taylor overcame a litany of health problems throughout the 90s, from diabetes to congestive heart failure. She had both hips replaced, and in 1997 had a brain tumor removed. In October 2009, Taylor, who has four children, underwent successful heart surgery. In early 2011, Taylor again experienced heart problems.

She was admitted to Cedars-Sinai Hospital in that February for congestive heart failure. On March 23, 2011, Taylor passed away from the condition.

Shortly after her death, her son Michael Wilding released a statement, saying “My mother was an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest, with great passion, humor, and love … We will always be inspired by her enduring contribution to our world.”

FILMOGRAPHY AS ACTOR
These Old Broads (12-Feb-2001)
The Flintstones (27-May-1994) · Pearl Slaghoople
Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert (20-Apr-1992) · Herself
Sweet Bird of Youth (1-Oct-1989)
Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989) · Herself
Young Toscanini (5-Sep-1988)
North and South (3-Nov-1985)
Malice in Wonderland (12-May-1985)
Between Friends (11-Sep-1983)
Genocide (14-Mar-1982) · Narrator [VOICE]
The Mirror Crack’d (19-Dec-1980)
A Little Night Music (Sep-1977)
Victory at Entebbe (13-Dec-1976)
The Blue Bird (5-Apr-1976)
That’s Entertainment! (23-May-1974) · Herself
The Driver’s Seat (20-May-1974)
Ash Wednesday (1-Nov-1973)
Night Watch (10-Aug-1973)
Hammersmith Is Out (12-May-1972)
Under Milk Wood (27-Jan-1972)
Zee and Co. (21-Jan-1972) · Zee Blakeley
The Only Game in Town (21-Jan-1970) · Fran Walker
Secret Ceremony (23-Oct-1968) · Leonora
Boom (26-May-1968) · Flora Goforth
The Comedians (31-Oct-1967) · Martha Pineda
Reflections in a Golden Eye (11-Oct-1967) · Leonora Penderton
Doctor Faustus (10-Oct-1967)
The Taming of the Shrew (27-Feb-1967) · Katharina
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (21-Jun-1966) · Martha
The Sandpiper (23-Jun-1965) · Laura Reynolds
The V.I.P.’s (1-Sep-1963) · Frances Andros
Cleopatra (12-Jun-1963) · Cleopatra
Butterfield 8 (4-Nov-1960) · Gloria Wandrous
Suddenly, Last Summer (22-Dec-1959) · Catherine Holly
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (18-Sep-1958) · Maggie Pollitt
Raintree County (4-Oct-1957) · Susannah Drake
Giant (10-Oct-1956) · Leslie Benedict
The Last Time I Saw Paris (18-Nov-1954) · Helen Ellswirth
Beau Brummell (1-Oct-1954)
Elephant Walk (21-Apr-1954) · Ruth Wiley
Rhapsody (11-Mar-1954) · Louise Durant
The Girl Who Had Everything (27-Mar-1953) · Jean Latimer
Ivanhoe (31-Jul-1952) · Rebecca
Love Is Better Than Ever (23-Feb-1952) · Anastacia Macaboy
A Place in the Sun (28-Aug-1951) · Angela Vickers
Father’s Little Dividend (12-Apr-1951) · Kay Dunstan
Father of the Bride (16-Jun-1950) · Kay Banks
The Big Hangover (26-May-1950)
Conspirator (9-Dec-1949) · Melinda Greyton
Little Women (10-Mar-1949) · Amy
Julia Misbehaves (8-Aug-1948) · Susan Packett
A Date with Judy (21-Jun-1948)
Cynthia (29-Aug-1947) · Cynthia Bishop
Life with Father (15-Aug-1947) · Mary
Courage of Lassie (8-Nov-1946) · Kathie Merrick
National Velvet (14-Dec-1944) · Velvet Brown
Lassie Come Home (10-Oct-1943) · Priscilla
There’s One Born Every Minute (26-Jun-1942)

Source: Elizabeth Taylor

Source: Elizabeth Taylor – Wikipedia

Source: Elizabeth Taylor – Actress, Film Actor/Film Actress, Film Actress – Biography.com

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