Happy 76th Birthday Mama Cass

Today is the 76th birthday of the singer Mama Cass. I remember those The Mamas and The Papas albums clearly, I was fascinated by the one that opened up and had the split in the photographs where you could put different heads on different bodies. I remember listening to them as a kid, they were my parent’s albums stored on the bottom shelf of the pantry in the back of the garage. Music is one of the largest memory trigger senses for people. The world is a better place because she was in it and still feels the loss that she has left.

mama cass

NAME: Mama Cass
OCCUPATION: Singer
BIRTH DATE: September 19, 1941
DEATH DATE: July 29, 1974
PLACE OF BIRTH: Baltimore, Maryland
PLACE OF DEATH: London, England
AKA: Cass Elliot
ORIGINALLY: Ellen Naomi Cohen
REMAINS: Cremated, Mount Sinai Memorial Park, Los Angeles, CA
ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME 1998

BEST KNOWN FOR: Cass “Mama Cass” Elliot was known for her heavyset figure, and was one of four members of the late 1960s pop sensation The Mamas and the Papas.

Cass Elliot, better known as “Mama Cass,” was born as Ellen Naomi Cohen on September 19, 1941 in Baltimore, Maryland. After initially pursuing a career in acting, Elliot became a folk singer. In 1963, she gained notice as part of an innovative folk trio called The Big Three. After recording two albums with bandmates Tim Rose and James Hendricks, the band began to fall apart, so she formed a new group, Cass Elliot and the Big Three—which also featured Hendricks, Denny Doherty and Zal Yanovsky. That group, renamed The Mugwumps, played mainly out of a Washington, D.C. nightclub, The Shadows. The Mugwumps broke up in early 1965, after releasing only one single, and Elliot began working as a solo singer.

In mid-1965, Elliot began singing with former Mugwump Doherty and the two other members of his new band, The New Journeymen: John and Michelle Phillips. The foursome, known as The Mamas and the Papas, were an overnight success, releasing a hit debut single, “California Dreamin’,” and album, If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears, by the end of 1965.

The Mamas and the Papas stayed together until 1968, releasing five albums and a series of Top 10 singles, including “Monday, Monday,” “I Saw Her Again” and “Dedicated to the One I Love.” Various problems within the group, including romantic jealousy (Elliot was reportedly in love with Doherty; Doherty became involved with Michelle Phillips), drug abuse, alcoholism and Elliot??’s constant struggle with her weight, led to the group’s eventual break-up in 1971.

On July 29, 1974, after a concert series at the London Palladium, Elliot was found dead in her hotel room. She had succumbed to heart failure, at the age of 32.

Elliot had been married twice, to Hendricks of The Big Three and The Mugwumps (1963-1968), and to Baron Donald von Wiedenman (1971). She had one daughter, Owen Elliot Kugell, in 1967. Owen accepted her mother’s award in 1998, when The Mamas and the Papas were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

TELEVISION
The Ray Stevens Show Regular (1970)

FILMOGRAPHY AS ACTOR
Pufnstuf (May-1970) · Witch Hazel
Monterey Pop (26-Dec-1968)

Source: Cass Elliot – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Source: Mama Cass – Singer – Biography.com

Source: The Truth about Cass Elliot | Legacy.com

Source: Mama Cass

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One thought on “Happy 76th Birthday Mama Cass

  1. She was indeed a great singer, such a tragic loss at an early age. I remember when the BBC broke the news of her death, it did not seem possible. We still have her music to listen to fortunately.

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