A Place in the Sun – Required Viewing

Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift have never looked more beautiful in their lives than they do in A Place in the Sun, but Shelley Winters’ performance kills me.  She breaks my heart, I can feel myself holding my breath during her scenes, she is spectacular.  Don’t get me wrong, I hold my breath during Liz and Monty’s scenes too, but Shelley is everything when she is on camera.   It is not an easy movie, it is not a happy movie, but it is absolutely everything.

a place in the sun

The Wiki:

A Place in the Sun is a 1951 American drama film based on the 1925 novel An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser and the play, also titled An American Tragedy. It tells the story of a working-class young man who is entangled with two women; one who works in his wealthy uncle’s factory and the other a beautiful socialite. The novel had been filmed once before, as An American Tragedy, in 1931.

A Place in the Sun was directed by George Stevens from a screenplay by Harry Brown and Michael Wilson, and stars Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, Shelley Winters, Anne Revere, and Raymond Burr.

The film was a critical and commercial success, winning six Academy Awards and the first ever Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama. In 1991, A Place in the Sun was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

democracy dies in darkness

 

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