Harold and Maude (1971)

Forty-eight years ago today, the film Harold and Maude premiered. This is one of my very favorite films for a number of quirky reasons. I love the tagline “They met at the funeral of a perfect stranger. From then on, things got perfectly stranger and stranger.” There is a theater in Seattle that shows this film every year on St. Valentine’s Day, it just seems like the perfect film to take your sweetheart to or go to alone and possibly meet your future sweetheart. You have to see this film.

harold

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Produced by: Colin Higgins, Charles B. Mulvehill
Written by: Colin Higgins
Starring: Ruth Gordon, Bud Cort
Music by: Cat Stevens
Cinematography: John Alonzo
Edited by: William A. Sawyer, Edward Warschilka
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release date: December 20, 1971
Running time: 91 minutes
Budget $1.2 million

Harold Chasen is a young man obsessed with death. He stages elaborate fake suicides, attends funerals, and drives a hearse, all to the chagrin of his socialite mother.[5] His mother sets up appointments with a psychoanalyst, but the analyst is befuddled by the case and fails to get Harold to talk about his real emotions.

At another stranger’s funeral service, Harold meets Maude, a 79-year-old woman who shares Harold’s hobby of attending funerals. He is entranced by her quirky outlook on life, which is bright and excessively carefree in contrast with his morbidity. The pair form a bond and Maude shows Harold the pleasures of art and music (including how to play banjo), and teaches him how to make “the most of his time on earth”.[5] Meanwhile, Harold’s mother is determined, against Harold’s wishes, to find him a wife. One by one, Harold frightens and horrifies each of his appointed dates, by appearing to commit gruesome acts such as self-immolation, self-mutilation and seppuku. She tries enlisting him in the military instead, but he deters his recruiting officer uncle by staging a scene in which Maude poses as a pacifist protester and Harold seemingly murders her out of militaristic fanaticism.

When Harold and Maude are talking at her home he tells her, without prompting, the motive for his fake suicides: When he was at boarding school, he accidentally caused an explosion in his chemistry lab, leading police to assume his death. Harold returned home just in time to witness his mother react to the news of his death with a ludicrously dramatized faint. As he reaches this part of the story, Harold bursts into tears and says, “I decided then I enjoyed being dead.”

As they become closer, their friendship soon blossoms into a romance and Harold announces that he will marry Maude, resulting in disgusted outbursts from his family, analyst, and priest. Maude’s 80th birthday arrives, and Harold throws a surprise party for her. As the couple dance, Maude tells Harold that she “couldn’t imagine a lovelier farewell.” Confused, he questions Maude as to her meaning and she reveals that she has taken an overdose of sleeping pills and will be dead by midnight. She restates her firm belief that eighty is the proper age to die.

Harold rushes Maude to the hospital, where she is treated unsuccessfully and dies. In the final sequence, Harold’s car is seen going off a seaside cliff but after the crash, the final shot reveals Harold standing calmly atop the cliff, holding his banjo. After gazing down at the wreckage, he dances away, picking out on his banjo Cat Stevens’ song “If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out”.

iconfinder_instagram_3709561 (1)  iconfinder_twiter_3709568

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.