Happy 107th Birthday Robert Capa

Today is the 107th birthday of the photographer Robert Capa. Often referred to the greatest war photographer of the 20th century, the world is a better place because he was in it and still feels the loss that he has left.

NAME: Robert Capa
ORIGINALLY: Endre Ernő Friedmann
DATE OF BIRTH: 22-Oct-1913
PLACE OF BIRTH: Budapest, Hungary
DATE OF DEATH: 25-May-1954
PLACE OF DEATH: Thai Binh, Vietnam
CAUSE OF DEATH: War
REMAINS: Buried, Amawalk Hill, Amawalk, NY
Croix de Guerre 1954 (posthumous)
Presidential Medal of Freedom 18-Nov-1947

BEST KNOWN FOR: Famous for an iconic 1936 photograph depicting the death of a loyalist, Federico Borrell García, during the Spanish Civil War, and for D-Day photographs taken during the first hours at Omaha Beach, published in Life magazine.

Robert Capa, original name (Hungarian form) Friedmann Endre Ernő, (born 1913, Budapest, Hungary—died May 25, 1954, Thai Binh, Vietnam), photographer whose images of war made him one of the greatest photojournalists of the 20th century.

In 1931 and 1932 Capa worked for Dephot, a German picture agency, before establishing himself in Paris, where he assumed the name Robert Capa. He first achieved fame as a war correspondent in the Spanish Civil War. By 1936 his mature style fully emerged in grim, close-up views of death such as Loyalist Soldier, Spain. Such immediate images embodied Capa’s famous saying, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, then you aren’t close enough.” In World War II he covered much of the heaviest fighting in Africa, Sicily, and Italy for Life magazine, and his photographs of the Normandy Invasion became some of the most memorable of the war.

After being sworn in as a United States citizen in 1946, Capa in 1947 joined with the photographers Henri Cartier-Bresson and David (“Chim”) Seymour to found Magnum Photos, the first cooperative agency of international freelance photographers. Although he covered the fighting in Palestine in 1948, most of Capa’s time was spent guiding newer members of Magnum and selling their work. He served as the director of the Magnum office in Paris from 1950 to 1953. In 1954 Capa volunteered to photograph the French Indochina War for Life and was killed by a land mine while on assignment. His untimely death helped establish his posthumous reputation as a quintessentially fearless photojournalist. Publications featuring his photographs include Death in the Making (1937), Slightly Out of Focus (1947), Images of War (1964), Children of War, Children of Peace (1991), and Robert Capa: Photographs (1996).

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.