‘Francis Bacon’ by Lucian Freud – Lost Artwork

Since several of his paintings have been sold for record-breaking amounts, including one that sold at auction for $142 million, the theft of a Lucien Freud portrait from a Berlin gallery 30 years ago is understandably one of the greatest art mysteries of modern times. The fact that the stolen painting was a portrait Freud painting by one of his fellow artist Francis Bacon makes the case even more intriguing. To date, despite the best efforts of the British government, the Berlin police and even the artist himself, Freud’s work remains missing.

It was in 1988 when the British Council organized an exhibition of Freud’s celebrated work in Berlin. The portrait of Bacon was sent to the German city on loan from the Tate in London. The exhibition had only been open a short while when the painting was taken off the wall and spitted away in an audacious robbery in broad daylight. Within a year, Freud received a ransom note from the thieves. However, according to the artist himself, the Berlin police dithered and the agreed exchange never took place. After that, all contact with the thieves was lost and the painting was gone for good.

More than a decade later, frustrated by the lack of developments, Freud went back to Berlin and put ‘Wanted’ posters up around the city. He even offered a reward of around $150,000 for information leading to the portrait’s return. Again, however, he had no luck. In London, the Tate Gallery remains confident that the painting will show up one day. Indeed, the work is still listed in its catalogue, with the disclaimer ‘not on display’ the only hint to suggest that it hasn’t been seen for years. Bacon himself was less hopeful. Before he died in 1992, he commented on the case. “Most likely it was burnt,” he says of the lost painting.

3 comments

    1. Shakespeare might have written the idea (apparel oft proclaims the man), but we’ve got to give Mark Twain some serious props for this one. He’s the one who said, “Clothes make a man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

      Like

Leave a Reply to Scott Parker-Anderson Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.